Author’s Corner Project

ABSTRACT

This Author’s Corner paper introduces the author of the five books summarized in this paper giving biographical information concerning the author’s interest, ambitions, and achievement. It summarizes the five books giving the description of the books, the narrations, the settings, the organizational structures, the themes, the sound, the characters, the diversity, the materials used for the illustrations, the patterns, and two extensions for each of the five books that a teacher could use to extend the conceptual understanding of the books in the classroom settings. This paper does not only give the summary of the books, but it also synthetically and analytically summarizes the five books showing relationships among the books in the areas of the setting, the theme, the organizational structure, the kinds of materials used for the illustrations, and the patterns and conclusively summarizes the five books. It delineates on the activity plan on each of the five books answering the various questions on the plan to satisfy the requirements for the plans used to teach the activity thereby extending the conceptual understanding of the books by extensions followed by the crowd prompt questionnaires. It concludes with the concept web incorporating the ten books with two extensions each that can be used to extend the understanding of these books.

AUTHOR’S BIOGRAPHY AND BACKGROUND

            Dolores Johnson was born on January 01, 1949 in the United States and raised in New Britain, Connecticut and she is a graduate of Boston University. She is the illustrator of Jenny by Beth P. Wilson, and she is the author-artist of What Will Mommy Do When I’m at School? What Kind of Baby Sitter Is This? and the Best Bug to Be. In addition to writing and illustrating books, she teaches children’s book writing at Los Angeles Southwest College.

While working on her book Now Let Me fly: The Story of a Slave Family, Dolores Johnson became fascinated with little-known aspects of African-American history. Seminole Diary is the result of that research. While she was writing the book, she visited two reservations in Florida and spoke with several Seminole tribal members (Johnson, pp. 31).

Now Let Me Fly had its beginnings in 1990 and 1991 when she was commissioned by the Children’s Museum of San Diego, California, to write a story and create paintings for an educational and cultural program in honor of Black History Month (Now Let Me Fly… pp. 16). She is also the author and illustrator of number of children’s books, including The Children’s Book of Kwaanza and Seminole Diary, and the illustrator of Big Meeting. She is a journalist who has worked on newspapers in Oregon, California, Wyoming and Colorado. She has desired to write and to sell a murder mystery. She tried writing books about an investigative reporter and a newspaper editor, but it wasn’t until she wrote a book about a dry cleaner, using her background as a free-lance writer and a reporter.

SUMMARY OF THE FIVE BOOKS

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Johnson, Dolores. (1993). Now Let Me Fly: The Story of a Slave Family. New York: Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing Division.

APPROPRIATE AGE: 5-9 Years old

SUMMARY & DESCRIPTION OF BOOK

A young girl describes how she once heard the sound of warning drums in Africa signaling the coming of horror. Kidnapped, made to march while chained, and taken to America to be sold at an action, she undergoes the brutalities of slavery in this tale of a strong-will who lives in harsh surrounding. Minna, a young African girl is purchased by Master Clemmons, who puts her to work picking cotton. Although she grows, marries, and bears four children, Minna’s life is not an easy one. Her husband and oldest son are sold to other slave’s owners and two other children are stolen away in which one is taken to safety in the North and the other to Florida to live with the Seminole Indian. Minna and her family are fictional characters, but their experiences are representative of many African-Americans from the mid-1500s to the mid-1800s who were dehumanized by the white slave masters of the south. This book is a historical fiction written in prose.

SETTING

The setting of the story is Africa dated in 1815 in the market place where Minna found a bird bound in a cage and consequently decided to free the bird from the cage saying that no living thing should be bound by any means. The setting of the story could be familiar to children in the African context since markets in Africa are located in the open fields as opposed to supermarket in the west.

CHARACTERS

Minna is kidnapped and she is placed in the ship with other African slaves from West Africa. She travelled in companionship with Amadi, her contemporary slave. Upon their arrival, they both are sold to Clemmons, their slave master. They both get married and four children are being born onto them in the named person of Joshua, Sally, Mason, and Katie. Mr. Amadi, her husband has been sold by the slave master followed by the sale of his son Joshua. Sally escaped to the North and Mason escaped to Florida. Only Minna and her younger daughter, Kitie, are left with the slave master to work. Kitie is devoted to work for the daughter of the slave master. Minna and her four children are seated together. The colors of attires worn are being painted in oil paint on canvas to represent their appearance as slaves in the plantations.

ILLUSTRATIONS

The illustrations in the story are painted in oil paint on canvas showing both African and European attires. In the preliminary section of the photograph, African slaves are chained and their masters stand with guns in their hands to shoot at any one who happens to escape from sight. In the next section, Seminole Indians stand with the escaped slaves and in this photo; it does not indicate oppression, but friendship with the escaped slaves from the south where the slave white masters live.

SOUNDS

In the search of sounds, I did not find any alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhyme in this story narration.

PATTERN AND STYLE

The illustrations portrayed in this story eventually predict that African slaves will be dehumanized by their slave masters because they are being chained. For example, the African slave, Minna, who was kidnapped by Dongo and taken to America and sold to Clemmons, her husband and her son were subsequently sold by her slave master to another location in the America to another slave masters for profits. The story is predictive based on the illustrations and actions of the slave masters.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:

Theme

The theme of this story is about slavery. Minna is being kidnapped as a girl in Africa. She endures the harsh life of a slave on a Southern plantation in the 1800s and tries to help her family survive. Determination for survival in the midst of oppression and dehumanization is the core theme of this historical fiction.

Organization

This story has a flow and intentionality of chronological events and consists of completeness and it is written in a clear and logical fashion. The story is a historical fiction which is very informative concerning the Trans-Atlantic and Trans-Angular trades which existed between Africa, American, and Europe during the 1800s.

Demonstration of diversity

Though the story is about slavery which does not emotionally appeal to children’s emotions in the positive sense; however, it demonstrates diversity with respect to the kind of people in the story which include the African slaves, the Seminole Indians, and the typical slave masters.

EXTENSION IDEAS

The two extensions of ideas that could enhance the concepts in the book include the following: The teacher along with the children could create a prop box of the slave master and the slave family. This prop box could be used to teach children about slavery which existed in time pass. Secondly, the children could dramatize this prop box representing each of the characters in the story in the dramatic play environment.

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Johnson, Dolores. (1994).Seminole Diary: Remembrances of a Slave: New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.

APPROPRIATE AGE: 6-9 years old

SUMMARY & DESCRIPTION OF THE BOOK

Gina, a young girl named, found her mother reading a diary in the attic of their house. Her mother told her that it has been handed down from their African-American ancestors and read it to her. This diary has been written by an African-American girl concerning hardships her father and younger sister experienced. Having been slaves, they decided to run away from their slave masters; as the result, they ran into a tribe of Seminole Indians who took them in as their slaves. They protected and treated them as brothers. The two sisters gradually grew apart because a woman of the tribe took in the younger sister as her own because her daughter died. The tribe, including the two sisters, eventually split up as some went to Oklahoma and some went to Florida. The book ends with the mother narrating to Gina as few more historical facts about the African-American slaves and the Seminole tribe. This book is an historical fictional book representing coincidental happening concerning the slavery in the Americas.

SETTING

The setting of this story is in Florida in 1836; however, the larger setting of the story is the date of the Seminole war which broke out in 1835 as the result of the effort of President Jackson’s administration to carry out its plans for the removal of the Seminole Indian tribes to tracts of land West of the Mississippi River; therefore, the setting of the story is an unfamiliar environment and time based on children’s knowledge as the result of its historical fictional nature.

CHARACTERS

In this story, an ancestor named Libbie and his father including her sister Clarissa joined other plantation slaves to run away from their cruel masters in 1834. In their runaway mission, some sought residence in Florida while the other sought residence in the Oklahoma. A modern day ancestor of Libbie happened to fine the diary which concerns the incidence of how the Seminoles helped these runaways during these years of slavery and decided to read it to Gina, her daughter. The diary is being read as the historical fictional incidence which represents contemporary happenings in the lives of African-American slaves. The Seminole Indian tribes including the slaves are being oil painted on canvas in the illustration which appears naturally to the human eyes.

ILLUSTRATIONS

The illustrations used in the story are oil painting on canvas which looks natural to the human eyes. The kinds of illustrations used with oil painting on canvas indicate oppression and subjection to tyrannical regime of the time. The slaves are chained to each other and the slave masters stand with guns in their hands to shoot anyone who happens to escape from sight. It is terrible which appears to the human emotions in the negative sense.

SOUNDS

With respect to sounds, alliteration is found in the November 13, 1834 diary. For example in line four of the first paragraph it reads, “I haven’t seen him since just after the Green Corn Dance, and I wonder and worry.”

PATTERN AND STYLE

With respect to pattern and style of this story, it is circular in that it starts with Gina asking her mother what she had in her hand. The mother responded saying that it was a valuable resource left by their ancestor, Libbie. She began to read the diary to her daughter. At the end of the reading, Gina also posed series of questions to her mother concerning the characters mentioned in the story diary. The story starts at the attic and ends there.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:

Theme

The theme of this story is that in the midst of oppression and ugliness, there are good people who are used in the lives of those who are victimized to bring release to them. The Seminole Indians become the evidence of this statement because they assisted African-American slaves by risking their lives to take them in their homes from the tyrannical hands of the white slave masters who dehumanized them depriving them from their God’s giving rights to live peacefully in this world.

Organization

This story ‘s introduction begins with questions and concludes with questions; unfortunately, between the introduction and the conclusion the story is being written in diary format; therefore, it is not being written in chronological order or events, but it is clear, logical, and informative.

Demonstration of diversity

The book is not inclusive and does not reflect positive attitudes toward all persons for the facts that it is about slavery or oppression of humanity who have God’s giving rights to be free from oppression of all types (physical, emotional, psychological, and spiritual). For this reason, diversity is not being presented in this story. The story is between Gina and her mother.

EXTENSION IDEAS

The two extension ideas which could extend the concepts in this book could be involving children to represent each of the characters in the story to carry out dramatic play and also organizing art activities to get them draw the various characters in the story. These two extensions of ideas can enhance the conceptual understanding of the book in theory and practice.

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Johnson, Dolores. (1998). Grandma’s Hands. New York: Marshall Cavendish Corporation.

APPROPRIATE AGE: 6-8 Years old

SUMMARY & DESCRIPTION OF BOOK

The story began when the boy’s mother took him out of the city and brought him to his Grandma. She told the boy that she was placing him in his Grandma’s hands; unfortunately, the boy was not satisfied to leave her, the city, and to live in an isolated and remote environment where he could be completely disconnected from the former thing he did such as playing baseball with friends. He is being taken to the farm and introduced into a strange environment that he did not like; as the result, he has written several letters asking his mother to get him out of this environment. His mother responded to few of his letters, but she did not tell him when she was going to come to take him to the city. One day his mother arrived and packed his suitcase, but the boy has been used to his Grandmother and desired to stay, but he has no alternative but to leave with his mother based on the requests made in the letters. He entered his mother’s vehicle. The Grandma gave him a farewell and he and his mother took off from the sight of the Grandma. Whenever he smells something sweet, he remembers that he is still in his Grandma’s hands because his grandmother introduced him to something sweet called star cookies when he stayed with her. This smell aroma flavor becomes a memory to the boy though he away from his grandmother.

SETTING

The story takes place on the farm because the boy’s mother decided to get him out of the city as to spend time with the Grandmother. She said that she was taking the boy out of the city in order place him in his Grandma’s hands. This setting is familiar to children since children like to see farm animals such as chicken, cows, kittens etc. In today’s field trip endeavors, children are taken in such places like farm to view farm animals contemporary to the farm animals in this story. The field trips become experiential for children and they are able to tell the story of their experiences and even name animals that they have seen on the farm during the field trip visitation.

CHARACTERS

The characters in the story that children can easily identify include horse, pigs, kittens, chicken, and dog and including the boy, the mother, and his grandmother. Children spend time with grandmothers sometimes during the summer break or vacation. Grandmothers are typical people who become helpers to their children and in-laws in term of child care services or baby sitting when their family members can not afford child care fees for their children with providers that they have to pay monetarily. The characters in the story are drawn or rendered in watercolor on papers which present the natural appearance of them.

ILLUSTRATIONS

The drawings used to represent the characters in the story are well drawn and rendered in watercolor on papers and they look very bright in appearance (natural).

SOUNDS

In the search of sounds, there is no alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhyme found in the story.

PATTERN AND STYLE

The pattern or style used in this story appears circularly in psychological format. At the beginning of the story, the mother placed the boy in his Grandma’s hands. At the end of the story the boy said, “Though I did get a chance to live with a grandma two more summers, I still miss her. Yet whenever I smell something sweet, see stars, or dream dreams, I’m back in my grandma’s hand.” Psychologically, the story is being replayed in the mind of the boy based on his experience while being with his grandmother. The story starts on the farm and ends there and it is being replayed circularly in psychological fashion through the mind of the boy.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

Theme

The theme in this story indicates that every child needs a home where there is love; even though, that love could be rough and scratchy. The Afro-American boy learns that every child needs a home where love is shown.

Organization

The organizational structure of this story is not chronological, but it is conversational between the Afro-American boy and his grandmother; nevertheless, it is written into clear and logical sequence with completeness, but its ending indicates psychologically that it has a circular structure.

Demonstration of diversity

In this story, there is no diversity demonstrated or shown in human elements. It is specifically about an African-American boy, the grandmother, and the mother. In term of animal elemental, diversity is shown.

EXTENSION IDEAS

The two extensions of ideas that could be carried out include the following: The children in the classroom could be asked to write letters to their mothers with the content as the Afro-American boy. Secondly, they could be asked to discuss each of the animals on grandmother’s farm and their economic benefits to humanity or children could go on a field trip to view these animals that they have read about in the story.

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Johnson, Dolores. (1993). Your Dad Was Just Like You. New York: Maxwell Macmillan International.

APPROPRIATE AGE: 5-8 Years Old

SUMMARY & DESCRIPTION OF BOOK

It is hard for most children to think that their parents ever had a childhood especially an energetic one doing the very things that the children enjoy. So it is for a little boy named Peter, whose father never seems to be satisfied with Peter and does not smile at all. One day Peter went to his grandfather door to seek protection after breaking some stupid ole purple thing on his father’s dresser. Grandfather takes Peter in and the two have a long walk and talk. Peter learns the importance of the purple thing and much more about a father who as a young boy loved running more than anything and told silly knock-knock jokes. Peter gains a beginning awareness of who his father is and what their relationship could be. This story is a fictional story, but actually represents daily life happening of energetic children in today’s societal environment.

SETTING

The setting of the story is the grandfather’s house which is familiar to most children because grand children sometimes spend time with their grand parents when their other parents are busy working or at school especially when it comes to child care services. Peter has gone to his grandfather’s house to seek protection from him after having broken an item which belongs to his father.

CHARACTERS

The characters in the story include Peter, his grandfather, and his father. The characters are graphically drawn and rendered in watercolor and colored pencil on paper showing the exact colors of attires each is wearing in the story. Peter’s father does not smile at all and he is easily angered; but his grandfather is different as compared to his father emotional status; therefore, Peter decides to be with his grandfather as the result of the current incidence of damaging the ole purple stupid thing on his father’s dresser.

ILLUSTRATIONS

The illustrations presented in this story are drawings which are rendered in watercolor and colored pencil on paper that are colorfully water colored representing the exact images of the grandfather, Peter, and his father.

SOUNDS

According to the sounds, there is no alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhyme device observed in the story.

PATTERN AND STYLE

According to the pattern or style of this story, it can be predicted that Peter will have gone to his father to reconcile as the result of his grandfather narration concerning that he was just like his father; therefore, his father need no harm for him. At the end of the story, Peter returns to his father and for the first time sees his father smiling and Peter tells his father that he loves him.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS:

Theme

The underlining themes of this story are family, love, and understanding which are appropriate for young children. It is a great book for a child and father to read together because the happenings in the story are contemporary to the daily happenings in the homes among family members.

Organization

The organization of the story is not intentionally chronological because it is being told between the grandfather and grandson concerning the incidence which has occurred as the result of breaking the item which belongs to Peter’s father. Grandfather explains to Peter the exact behavior of his father when he was younger just like him. However, the story ends with completeness in a clear and logical fashion.

Demonstration of diversity

The characters in the story are African-American which is great because it is important to have diversity in children’s picture books; notwithstanding, the other illustrated pictures at the end of the book show diversity with respect to race.

EXTENSION IDEAS

The two extensions of ideas that could extend the concepts in this book would be children taking up roles as Son, grandfather, and father and have this story acted in the dramatic play approach. Secondly, children could be asked to explain the relationship which exists between them and their fathers or parents in the homes and ask them to make pictures of the fathers and grandfathers.

BIBLIOGRAPHICAL INFORMATION

Johnson, Dolores. (1999). My Mom Is My Show-And-Tell. New York: Scholastic Inc.

APPROPRIATE AGE: 6-8 Years old

SUMMARY & DESCRIPTION OF BOOK

David and his Mother went to his school where she is scheduled to participate in the “Show-And-Tell” program. While they both traveled, they began to carry out conversation concerning how his Mother was going to deliberate on the Show-And-Tell program. On their way, they passed at Mrs. Thomas’ house where Mrs. Alice Spencer, David’s mother talked briefly with Mrs. Thomas. While they headed to the school, David mentioned individuals who had been at the program before. They include Erin’s mother, the doctor, Robert’s father, the lawyer, and Marla’s mother, the singer. He explained to his mother the activities of these individuals at the Show-And-Tell program. While they journeyed, David observed that his mother shoes laces were untied and he therefore decided to tie them. After tying them, the mother headed to the school with dancing. Mrs. Alice Spencer entered the class wherein she is briefly talked about by Mrs. Adams. David is asked to introduce his Mother to the class and eventually did it accordingly.

SETTING

The setting of this story is at the school which is familiar to children. For example, David did invite his mother to school to be his show-and-tell. He stands to introduce his mother to the class after his teacher; Mrs. Adams had briefly talked about his mother and invited him to do the introduction.

CHARACTERS

The characters in the story are Mrs. Alice Spenser, David’s mother, Mrs. Thomas, the grandma, Mrs. Lee, the singer and Marla’s mother, Mr. Perez, the lawyer and Robert’s father, Dr. Abbott, the doctor and Erin’s father, Mrs. Adams, the teacher at school, and the students who served as the audience for the show-and-tell program. Mr. Perez is the lawyer who talks too much, Mrs. Lee is a singer who likes singing, and Dr. Abbott is a medical doctor who likes to talk about bones, germs, and bacteria according to the narration carried out by David while he and his mother headed to the school in order fulfill their commitment made concerning the parent “Show-And-Tell” program.

ILLUSTRATIONS

The illustrations in the story represent students, lawyer, doctor, singer, teacher, and parent who represent segments of societies with their attires according to their occupations and works. The pictures are being rendered in watercolor on canvas and they are very bright in colors of red, yellow, purple, black, white, brown, green, and mixed varieties of colors to present each individual in the story conveying their occupations. For example, the medical doctor dressed accordingly.

SOUNDS

There is no alliteration, onomatopoeia, and rhyme observed in the story.

PATTERN AND STYLE

The pattern or style of this book indicates and predicts while Mrs. Alice Spencer and her son, David travel to the school for the show-and-tell program. Mrs. Alice Spencer was going to speak to the student body at school and this is predictive based on the conversation held between David and his mother while they both headed to the school program. One of the patterns observed in the story is David has been called several times in the story by his mother the name, “Pumpkin.” This is repetition.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS

Theme

The story is about David who invited his mother to school as his Show-And-Tell. He admonishes his mother beforehand about how she should react. That is the things she should do and not do and things she should say and not say. This story is humorous and also helps to show that children are aware of their environments as well as their behaviors are concerned.

Organization

The organization of the book is conversational between David and his mother as opposed of being chronologically presented; however, it is clearly and logically written, but it does not have completeness. Mrs. Alice Spencer, David’s mother, did not speak on the show and tell program after having been introduced by her son, David. Probably, it is implied that she might have spoken, but it has not been mentioned before the story comes to an end.

Demonstration of diversity

This story indicates diversity in that students, lawyers, doctors, singers, teachers, parents, and diverse races are characters being mentioned in the story that play specific roles. These diversities can encourage extensions of ideas to remind teachers to incorporate activities that could lead students to understanding the concept of the book or story in various dimensions such as science, art, dramatic play etc.

EXTENSION IDEAS

The two of the extensions of ideas that could enhance the concepts of the book include the following. Students could act as doctors, lawyers, and singers in the dramatic play. Secondly, students could act as speakers on the Show-And-Tell program to speak on specific topic of theirs. Prop box could be made at which each character could be represented.

BOOKS SUMMARY

SYNTHESIS

            The book entitled “Let Me Fly: A Story of a Slave Family” is a historical fictional book which talks about the existence of slavery back in the 1815 when Africans were being kidnapped by their own people and sold to the slave masters of the United States to work under plantations established by these slave masters. Minna, an African, has been kidnapped by Mr. Donzo along with other kidnapped Africans and put on the board the ship as sardines and taken to America. While on board Minna is being attached to one of the slaves named Amadi. After having arrived in the United States, they both are being sold to Mr. Clemmons, their slave master. Amadi and Minna married and four children are born to them. After a while, the slave master sold Amadi and his son, Joshua to other slave masters of the plantations. Sally and Mason, Minna’s children fled and sought refuge in the North and to Florida while Kattie, the youngest child is left with her mother to work for the slave master’s daughter.

            In this story, characters are diverse and are representations of slaves, Indians, and slave masters. Slaves are chained in painting attires of red and green colors. From the illustrated pictures, the pattern and style is predictive of the horrible treatment that these slaves are going to receive from the slave masters. The story is organized in chronological events and portrayed diversity which could be used in the classroom environment for an extension of ideas for dramatic play and prop box activities for children for the conceptual understanding of the book in its contextualization. Children’s capability to comprehend materials taught in the classroom depends on developmentally appropriate practices (DAP) centering on the age characteristics, cultural or social context, and child’s individualism. The age that could read this book with better understanding is from 5-9 years old not taking into consideration exceptionalities.

            The book entitled “Seminole Diary: Remembrances of a Slave” is a diary written by an African ancestor named Libbie whose father and sister, Clarissa, including Libbie fled from their slave masters and sought refuge with the Seminole Indians. The Indians took and protected them and they eventually became as brothers to them. Gina’s mother, one of the posterities of the ancestors has taken the diary to read in the attic. Gina is curious to know what her mother is reading from this book. She posed questions to her mother concerning the story being read to her.

            This story takes place in Florida in 1836; however, the larger setting of the story actually occurred during the Seminole’s war in 1835 when Jackson’s administration asked the United States military to get the Indians from the settlement at which the slaves who resided with the Seminole Indian tribe had to fight back along with the Indians. The characterization of the story is diverse which include slaves and Seminole Indians. The illustrations are slaves and Seminole Indians painted in colors of red and green. With respect to sounds, alliteration is being used while pattern and style is obviously circular. With regards to organizational structure, it is written in diary format which does not conform to the chronological eventual order. Diversity is minimally presented in the story comprising of Africans and Indians illustrations. With respect to extensions, children could represent Africans and Indians for a dramatic play acted on stage to practically present the conceptual understanding of this story. This book can be used for age range of 6-9 years old.

            The book entitled “Your Dad Was Just Like You” is the story that explains the incidence between Peter and his father. Peter has mistakably broken the ole stupid purple thing from his father’s dresser and eventually sought refuge to his grandfather’s house. The grandfather takes Peter on a long walk while he reconciled the incidence and thereby worked on Peter psychological code to make him understand that he was just like his father when his father was growing up. Peter having understood that his father is not actually against him returned to him with love in an apology format.

            Characterization is familial which illustrates Peter, his grandfather, and his father in the painting of yellow, red, and blue. Its theme centered on family, love, and understanding. With respect to pattern and style, the story is predictive and its organizational structure is chronological. Diversity is being encouraged. Children could take the role of Peter, his grandfather, and Peter’s father to extend the conceptual understanding of the book in dramatic play. The age range of children that could use this book based on developmentally appropriate activities is 5-8 years old.

            The book entitled “My Mom Is My Show-And-Tell” is a book explaining the intentional move David made to invite his Mother, Mr. Alice Spencer to his school to serve as a speaker on the Show-And-Tell program day. While they both travelled to the school, David is anxious about his mother’s speech and therefore admonished her what to say and what not to say and what to do and what not to do mentioning three speakers who had previously served on this program and they were being ridiculed by his classmates. David and his mother arrived at school and he is asked to introduce his mother for the Show-And-Tell speech. He does the introduction.

            The theme of the book is how children become aware of their environment and therefore act consciously to guide against eventuality. Diversity is presented based on characterizations of the story. The illustrations indicate painting of red, yellow, and blue and those present the various characters in their make-up fashions. The pattern and style of the book are predictive and repetitive. The organizational structure is conversational which is clearly and logically written, but lacks completeness. Based on characterizations, children could act as students, lawyers, doctors, parents, and singers to present the story practically in dramatic play on stage to extend the conceptual understanding of the book. The setting of this story is the school and the age range of children that can use this literature is from 6-8 years old.

            The book entitled “Grandma’s Hands” is a story which narrates the mother taking her son from the city and then taking him to his grandmother’s farm. The boy is being isolated from the city and the activities he loves; therefore, he is not satisfied with this decision. He is angry and his face fell. He writes several letters asking his mother to get him out of the farm. His mother responds few to his request. One day his mother arrived and decided to take him based on his request. He has been used to his grandmother; therefore, changed his mind to go; however, he must go. He got in his mother’s vehicle and his grandmother gave him farewell and he is driven out of the sight from his grandmother.

            The setting of this story is the grandmother’s farm which comprises of the characterizations of the boy, grandmother, and animals colorfully painted in red, yellow, blue, and black. The organizational structure of the book is conversational and written in a clear and logical sequence and there is no diversity being encouraged with respect to exceptionalities as seen in the illustrated photographs. The conceptual understanding of the book could be enhanced by children’s writing to their parents on specific subject of theirs. The pattern and style of the book is circular and age range that could use this book is from 6 to 8 years old.

ANALYSIS

Age Characteristics

            Among the five books reviewed, 2/5 or 40% of the books can be used by children whose age ranges from 5 to 8 years old while 2/5 or 40% of the books can be used by children whose age ranges from 6-8 years old and the remaining book 1/5 or 20% can be used by children whose age ranges from 6-9 years old. This analysis is not based on children with exceptionalities but it is based on normal development of children with respect to developmentally appropriate age gap based on cognition and language capability. The books are listed below in the table with the appropriate age range and percentages.

NO Books Author Age Percentages
1 Now Let Me Fly: A Story of a Slave Family Dolores Johnson 5-8 40%
2 Your Dad Was Just Like You Dolores Johnson 5-8 40%(repeated)
3 My Mom Is My Show-And-Tell Dolores Johnson 6-8 40%
4 Grandma’s Hands Dolores Johnson 6-8 40%(repeated)
5 Seminole Diary: Remembrances of a Slave Dolores Johnson 6-9 20%

Settings

            The settings of Your Dad Was Just Like You and Grandma’s Hands are similar which eventually occurred in the home environment; unlike, the settings of Now Let Me Fly, My Mon Is My Show-And-Tell, and the Seminole Diary occurred in different environments or settings. The similarities and the dissimilarities of these stories with respect to the occurrences of the settings depend on the nature of the story and the background and intent of the writers.

Illustrations

            The materials used for illustrations for Now Let Me Fly and Seminole Diary are oil paints rendered on canvas while for Grandma’s Hands and Your Dad Was Just Like You are rendered in watercolor on papers. The illustration for My Mom is My ShowAnd Tell is rendered in watercolor on canvas.

Organization

            The organizational structures of My Mom Is My Show-And-Tell, Seminole Diary, and Grandma’s Hands are conversational and they are written in a clear and logical fashion understandable to the reader while the organizational structures of Now Let Me Fly and Your Dad Was Just Like You are written in chronological eventual order.

Pattern and Style

            The pattern and style of Now Let Me Fly and Your Dad Was Just Like You are predictive and My Mom Is My Show-And-Tell is both predictive and repetitive. Unlike the pattern and style of Seminole Diary and Grandma’s Hands is circular.

Sounds

            Among the books reviewed, only Seminole Diary contains alliteration; unlike, the other four do not contain any sounds as per my search of the books.

Diversity

            Among the books reviewed, Your Dad Was Just Like You, My Mom Is My ShowAnd-Tell, and Now Let Me Fly exhibit diversity; unlike, Seminole Diary and Grandma’s Hands do not contain diversity.

CONCLUSION SUMMARY

Johnson being a journalist and a free lance writer on children’s book, has been fascinated with little known aspects of African American history in recent time; meanwhile, her writings on issues are contemporary happenings in today’s lives of communities, neighborhoods, institutions, and families. The books summarized in this document are evidential and substantial to this claim. The activity plans, crowd prompts questions, and webbing continue on the preceding pages of this document.

ACTIVITIES, PROMPTS, AND WEBBING

Activity Plan: Now Let Me Fly: A Story of a Slave Family

Activity Title:             Slavery            Curriculum Area(s): Social Studies

Appropriate Age or Age Range: 5-9 Years Old

Developed By: Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan

JUSTIFICATION/MOTIVATION

Since the children have learned about the slave family and what happened to contemporary slave families in days of slavery in America, it will be necessary to dramatize this slavery activity using the prop box at which characters in the story would represent the materials in the prop box. When the prop box is displayed, students will be asked in the presence of the teacher to name characters in the prop box while pointing at each symbolic character in the prop box to explain what each of these characters played in the story of the African slave family. The next subsequent activity will be followed by students coloring or painting the pictures of the African slave family.

OBJECTIVES

Physical/motor: Children will develop fine motor skills when they draw and color pictures of the African slaves and slave master.
Cognitive/language: Children will develop cognitive or language skills when they name characters in the story and explain the role of each character.
Social: Children will develop social skills when they interact with other children who are involved in the activity.
Emotional: Children will develop emotionally when they are able to self-manage themselves in going along with other children tolerating their weaknesses of hurt feeling without being misaligned emotionally.

MATERIALS

Since characters in the story are human beings, human dolls will be used to represent them. Each of the dolls will have clothes on them as typical slaves and slave master. Each doll will represent a slave master, Mr. Clemmons, a kidnapped African girl, Minna, children: Joshua, Sally, Mason, and Kitie and Mr. Amadi, the husband. These items form the content of the prop box. Excluding the dolls, crayons, pencils, construction papers, child size table and chairs, markers, and color pencils and the plastic container hosting prop box materials will be provided.

PREPARATION

In order to carry out this activity, dolls representing slaves and slave master, crayons, pencils, construction papers, child size table and chairs, markers, and color pencils will have been provided to form the content of the prop box and this activity. I will prepare designated area for the activity. Number of children to accommodate depends on the size of the classroom. I will prepare one room where the prop box will be displayed and one room where the children will draw. Every table in the room will carry crayons, pencils, color pencils, markers, and construction papers. Two children are to a table and a total of three tables, six chairs, and six children per session. While the six children are discussing the prop box in one of the rooms, the six children are coloring the pictures of the African family and slave master.

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT THE CHILDREN TO DO?

Children will take each material item from the prop box, name, and explain the role of that character in the story and children will draw and color while engaged in this activity.

VOCABULARY

The five words children will learn while engaged in this activity include following:

  1. Slaves
  2. Slavery
  3. Slave Master
  4. Kidnapped
  5. Force labor

EXTENSIONS

Prop Box: In the prop box activity, children will name characters and explain the role of that character in the story.

Drama: In this dramatic play on stage, children will dramatize the role of each character (slaves and slave master) in the story.

Drawing: In this activity, children will color the characters in the story.

DOCUMENTATION

Three ways in which I will document the children’s learning activity include the following:

  1. Video Taping
  2. Portfolios
  3. Anecdotal Recording

OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS

  1. Explain how Minna was taken to America.
  2. How did the two children of Minna escape?
  3. How would you react to the treatment of slave Master, Mr. Clemmons?

Prompt Crowd Questions:

Completion

  1. I never forget the day I first wanted to _________________ pp. 2
  2. I lived in Africa. True/False                pp. 2

Recall

  1. What happened to Minna after she was kidnapped?
  2. What happened to her after she has fled?

Open-ended

  1. Tell the class about slavery in America.
  2. Explain how Minna came to America.

Wh-Question

  1. How did slave feel in America?
  2. How were they treated by slave masters?

Distancing

  1. How would you feel if you were a slave?
  2. How would you react to slave masters?

Activity Plan: Seminole Diary: A Remembrance of A Slave

Activity Title: Diary Writing                                      Curriculum Area(s): Writing

Appropriate Age or Age Range: 6-9 Years Old

Developed By: Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan

JUSTIFICATION/MOTIVATION

Since children have learned about the Seminole Diary and its valuable importance to human history as dictated in the story, it will be expedient to have them involved into writing diary. It informs the significance of recording daily happenings and keeping tracks of those happenings that could be valuable resources for research and investigated purposes. While children partake of this activity, it shapes them in refining their cognitive and motor skills capability and thereby improving on them.

OBJECTIVES

Physical/motor: Children will develop fine motor skills when they write their diaries and color pictures of the Seminole Diary, Ginna, and her mother.
Cognitive/language: Children will develop cognitive or language skills when they write and read their diaries before the class.
Social: Children will develop social skills when they interact with class members during the activity.
Emotional: Children will develop emotionally when they are able to self-manage themselves with respect to tolerating others.
MATERIALS

Materials which enhance this activity will include pencils, construction papers, ordinary papers, tables, chairs, color pencils, writing pads, postal sheets, note books, folders, and copies of the Seminole Diary.

PREPARATION

I will provide and organize the materials and tools mentioned above. Every child’s table and chair are strategically positioned in the art activity classroom and materials and tools are placed on each table per student proportionally before the activity begins.

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT THE CHILDREN TO DO

Children will be asked to write what had happened to them last week taking into account date of happening. I will provide alternative dates that they can use in writing their diaries.

VOCABULARY

Vocabularies children could learn while carrying out this activity will include the follow:

  1. Diary
  2. Seminole Diary
  3. Attic
  4. Ancestors
  5. Hardships

EXTENSIONS

Writing: Children will be asked to write a weekly diary explaining what they have encountered.

Drawing: Children will be asked to color Seminole Diary, Ginna, and her mother.

Reading: Each child will be asked to read his or her diary to the class.

DOCUMENTATION
Three ways I could document this activity include the following:

  1. Audio/Video Taping
  2. Portfolios
  3. Child’s developmental checklist

OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS

1.   Tell what you know about the Seminole Diary.

  1. How did the mother of Ginna discover the Seminole Diary?
  2. Explain Ginna’s reaction before the reading of the Seminole Diary and after the reading of the diary.

Prompt Crowd Questions:

Completion

  1. Ginna found her mother in the ____________________ pp. 2
  2. Ginna’s mother looked at her _____________________ pp. 2

Recall

  1. What role did Ginna’s mother play in the story after her daughter asked her?
  2. What contribution did Ginna make after she saw her mother reading the diary?

Open-ended

  1. Tell the class how Libbie, her father and her sister, Clarissa, got in the hands of the Seminole Indians?
  2. Explain who the Seminole Indians were.

Wh-Question

  1. What do you think the Seminole tribes show kindness to the Afro-American slaves?
  2. What prompted them to become good neighbors to the slaves?

Distancing

  1. How would you feel if you were a slave?
  2. How would you respond to the Seminole Indians’ kindness?

Activity Plan: Grandma’s Hands

Activity Title: Field Trip                                            Curriculum Area(s): Science

Appropriate Age or Age Range: 6-8 Years Old

Developed By: Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan
JUSTIFICATION/MOTIVATION
Since children have learned how David was taken from the city and taken to his grandmother’s farm where he saw varieties of farm animals, it will be informative and educative for children to see these contemporary farm animals in real life situation.

OBJECTIVES

Physical/motor: Children will develop fine motor skills when they .color the pictures of farm animals upon their return from the field trip.
Cognitive/language: Children will develop cognitive or language skills when they identify and name farm animals.
Social: Children will develop social skills when they interact with their peers during the field trip.
Emotional: Children will develop emotionally when they are able to self-manage themselves through tolerance and patience with others.
MATERIALS

Since this activity involves field trip endeavor, students shall be given permission forms to be taken to parents for approval. The arrangement of bus for transportation, children’s lunches for feeding, field trip fees of $10.00, note taking notebooks for students, and proper attires shall be recommended.

PREPARATION

I will inform the school administration concerning the field trip endeavor with respect to the date and venue or destination. Students shall be given permission forms for parents’ approval and all necessary information given to students about fees, materials needed, and proper attires to be worn during the field trip.

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT THE CHILDREN TO DO?

Children will watch farm animals. I will assemble children after the watching of farm animals and ask them questions concerning their experiences.

VOCABULARY

Children will learn the following vocabularies from the story and from the field trip.

  1. Animals’ feeds
  2. cows
  3. pigs
  4. horses
  5. garden

EXTENSIONS

Identification: Children will identify farm animals by name as the pictures are presented to them.

Drawing: Children will identify and color farm animals during class session.

Naming: Children will name farm animals and explain their economic importance to humanity.

DOCUMENTATION
The three ways I could document this activity included the following:

  1. Audio/Video Taping
  2. Children’s portfolios
  3. Developmental checklist

OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS
1.   Explain the importance of farm animals.

2.   What have you seen and learned during the field trip endeavor?

  • Compare and contrast the farm animals you saw during the field trip the ones seen in the story we read in class a week ago.

Prompt Crowd Questions:

Completion

  1. My Grandma drove in a ___________________ pp.8
  2. But I am a ______________________________ pp. 28

Recall

  1. What happened David’s mother arrived to take him home?
  2. What did David’s grandma tell him before departing?

Open-ended

  1. Tell the class David’s reaction when he was dropped on his grandma’s farm.
  2. Tell the class how David felt.

Wh-Question

  1. What did David think when he was asked to leave the grandma?
  2. What did the grandma tell David before the arrival his mother?

Distancing

  1. How would you feel if it were you?
  2. How would your reaction be?

Activity Plan: Your Dad Was Just Like You

Activity Title:             Breaking Materials                  Curriculum Area(s): Dramatic Play

Appropriate Age or Age Range: 5-8 Years Old

Developed By: Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan
JUSTIFICATION/MOTIVATION

Since most energetic children of today’s society or homes may mistakenly run into things or deliberately sometimes destroy property on purpose or by accidence, it will be necessary to title this activity as indicated above (Breaking Materials). It also will remind children in the childcare environment that destruction of property or materials in these settings are prohibited and it can not be tolerated by any child care provider or teacher.

OBJECTIVES

Physical/motor: Children will develop fine motor skills when they color the pictures of Peter, his grandfather, and his father.

Cognitive/language: Children will develop cognitive or language skills when they dramatize the breaking of the ole purple thing while communicating and reasoning such thing will be wrong to do in childcare environment or at home especially when it is done on purpose instead of accidental.
Social: Children will develop social skills when they interact with other children thereby experiencing friendships.
Emotional: Children will develop emotionally when they are able to self-manage themselves in term of conflict and resolution through tolerance.

MATERIALS

In this activity, children will represent the characters in this story which include the boy Peter, his grandfather, and his father. In addition, a toy dresser and a foil will be used to represent the ole purple thing which hangs on Peter’s father dresser. The children will dramatize this part of the story when Peter broke the ole purple thing on his father’s dresser and the reaction of his father coupled with his grandfather’s intervention.

PREPARATION

I will assemble the children on the periodical basis to practice this dramatic play using children to represent these characters. Children will be taught their parts in the play with respect to roles and action play. I will gather the toy dresser and the foil which represents the ole purple thing. The date and the arrangement of the classroom environment will have been carried out before the drama takes place. Children will be informed about the date and time of the drama.

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT THE CHILDREN TO DO?

The children will dramatize this story representing Peter, Peter’s grandfather, and his father. Children will color and name items in the prop box that represent Peter, his grandfather, and his father including the ole purple thing and the dresser.

VOCABULARY

The five words children will learn during the play include the following:

  1. Dresser
  2. Ole purple thing
  3. Broke
  4.  Angry
  5. Grandfather’s intervention

EXTENSIONS

Dramatic Play: Children can dramatize this story in the dramatic and pretend play fashions.

Drawing: Children can use crayons to color the picture of Peter, his grandfather, father and other features in the story.

Prop Box: The teacher can create a prop box and have it displayed to enable children have conceptual understanding of the story.

DOCUMENTATION
The three ways that this activity could be documented includes the following:

  1. Audio/video Taping
  2. Portfolios
  3. Anecdotal Recording

OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS
The three open-ended questions that I could ask during the activity include the following:

  1. What happened when Peter broke the ole purple thing from his father’s dresser? If it were you how would you react?
  2. Tell the class the import of Peter’s grandfather in the story.
  3. Tell the class about Peter in the story.

Prompt Crowd Questions:

Completion

  1. My did was a boy just __________________ pp.10
  2. Dad played in my ________________ pp. 12

Recall

  1. What happened when Peter stood at his grandfather’s house to explain the incidence between him and his father?
  2. What was the reaction of Peter’s grandfather after the explanation?

Open-ended

  1. Tell the class how Peter felt when he broke the ole purple thing on his father’s dresser?
  2. Give explanation concerning his father’s reaction to the incidence.

Wh-Question

  1. Why no one congratulated Peter’s father when won the trophy?
  2. Who do you think should have congratulated him?

Distancing

  1. How would you feel if you were the one un-congratulated?
  2. How would you react to the incidence?

Activity Plan: My Mom Is My Show-And Tell

Title: Public Speaking             Curriculum Area(s): Social Studies

Appropriate Age or Age Range: 6 – 8 Years Old

Developed By: Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan

JUSTIFICATION/MOTIVATION

Since this story involves David inviting his mother to serve as speaker on the Show-And Tell program, it will be expedient to use this activity to introduce children to public speaking. If the children can demonstrate this activity among themselves, it will alleviate some inferiority complexes from children with respect to talking to group of their age gap. This activity will enable children to use their social, cognitive, linguistic, physical, and emotional domains thereby affecting these milestones of development. The early the children are introduced to public speaking the sooner they develop the concept of leadership.

OBJECTIVES

Physical/motor: Children will develop fine or gross motor skills when they walk on stage and use gestures in giving their speeches.
Cognitive/language: Children will develop linguistic skills when they give speeches during the occasion.
Social: Children will develop social skills when they .interact with peers during the occasions.
Emotional: Children will .develop emotionally when they are able to tolerate others and conduct themselves accordingly.
MATERIALS

In order to enhance this activity, I will gather construction papers, pencils, pens, sheets, stands and distribute topics that each child will be speaking on.

PREPARATION

Prior to the day of the public speaking, each child will be given a written document on the topic assigned to him or her. Each child will be taught the piece of writing to be read to the audience during the occasion. There will be consistent practices and rehearsals prior to the day of performance. If possible, children will be asked to memorize their speeches. Before the speech’s day, the auditorium will be set up and parents will be written letters inviting them for this speech’s day.

WHAT DO YOU EXPECT THE CHILDREN TO DO?

Children will be involved in giving speeches and at the same time serve as the audience.

VOCABULARY

  1. Audience
  2. Speeches
  3. Speaker
  4. Program
  5. Show-And Tell day

EXTENSIONS

Dramatic Play: Children will act as teachers in the dramatic play environment.

Prop Box: A prop will be made showing doctor, instruments that doctor used, and attire. Children will be asked to name these basis instruments as they look at various items in the prop box.

Drawing/Coloring: Children will be asked to color the pictures of these materials in the prop box. Hence, the pictures of these items will have been provided to children to color.

DOCUMENTATION

The three ways that these activities could be documented include the following:

  1. Children’s portfolios
  2. Audio/Video Tapping
  3. Anecdotal Recording

OPEN-ENDED QUESTIONS

  1. Tell me what you learn during the speech’s day.
  2. How did you feel when you were called out to give your speech?
  3. Tell the class how the lawyer and the doctor conducted themselves during the Show-And Tell program according to David.

Prompt Crowd Questions:

Completion

  1. My Mom is my ________________ pp. 20
  2. My Mom is coming to speak on _________________ pp. 18

Recall

  1. What happened when David tied his Mom’s shoes?
  2. What was the reaction of the children at school when they saw David’s mother dancing?

Open-ended

  1. Tell the class when happened on the journey when David and his mother walked to school.
  2. What motivated David to invite his mother to serve on the Show-And Tell program?

Wh-Question

  1. Who introduced Ms Alice Spencer for the Show-And Tell program?
  2. How did Ms Alice Spencer feel when she was invited by her son to speak?

Distancing

  1. How would react if you were called to serve on such occasion?
  2. How your feeling would be if so invited?