Capstone Project

ABTRACT

This document delineates the Capstone Project that makes assessment on five children age 5 each using the developmental checklist, anecdotal record, running record, and child and family’s interview. The use of these assessment tools led to the development of individualized child charts that give light to what kind of activities that could be implemented to scaffold the children developmental milestones. The implementation of these activities gave rise to the documentation and reflection to figure out what has been achieved and the disadvantages or the backdrops experienced during the assessment.

Student Observer: Jallah Koiyan

Course and section #: EDU 284-01

Child’s Initials: H.G

Date of Birth: February 22, 2013

Age in __5__Years _6___MONTHS

Location of Observation: Shamrock Gardens Elementary

                                    3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205

Date(s)/Time/Duration of Observation: 9/19/2018/4:00 PM/60 Minutes

FIVE YEARS OLD

BEHAVIOR Date of Observation Y/N Did the child demonstrate the behavior (Y), attempt but not successfully demonstrate the behavior (N) SO/PR/TR Student Observed (SO) Parent Report (PR) Teacher Report (TR) Comments What did you observe that led you to select Y/N?   What did the parent or teacher report?
Motor Development        
Walks backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel) 9/19/2018 N SO I did not observe H.G doing such; however, he runs with speed.
Walks up and down stairs putting one foot on each step without holding a railing or adult hand. 9/19/2018 N SO I did not observe H.G doing such activity; however, he runs on playground during ball play or soccer.
Can complete a forward roll (somersault) 9/19/2018 Y SO I saw H.G running forward on the play ground; but he did not somersault.
Can touch his/her toes without bending his knees 9/19/2018 N SO I did not observe H.G doing such.
Demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam 9/19/2018 Y   I saw H.G walked on the benched situated at the playground.
Skips by alternating his/her feet   9/19/2018 N SO I did not see H.G skip by alternating feet.
Steers a tricycle or two-wheeler with training wheels 9/19/2018 N SO There is no such equipment on the playground for H.G to use.
Jumps forward 10 times   9/19/2018 Y SO I saw H.G jumped forward; however, his jumping was not counted.
Can balance on one foot for 10 seconds 9/19/2018 Y SO I saw H.G balanced on one foot for more than 10 seconds.
When looking at a picture or model, he/she can replicate a three-dimensional structure using blocks 9/19/2018 N SO I did not observe H.G doing such activity.
Copies many letters and shapes when drawing 9/19/2018 Y SO I have seen H.G drawing lot of shapes including letters. He loves drawing and coloring things.
Exhibits control when using a pen or pencil 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G holds pen or pencil very well when drawing or writing.
Cuts along a line with scissors (does not have to be perfect) 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G usually uses scissors to cut papers or pictures drawing art project.
Handedness (Right or Left hand preference) has been established 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G usually works with his right hand the most.
Perceptual-Cognitive Development        
Can create a rectangle shape when given two triangles 9/19/2018 N SO I have not seen H.G performed such activity.
Using small blocks or cubes, the child can build steps 9/19/2018 Y SO I have seen H.G built various blocks using steps.
Understands the concept of same when talking about size and shape 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G recognizes and differentiates between things with reference to size and shape.
Categorizes objects using two dimensions (ex. color and size) 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G can arrange things according to their size and color.
When presented with objects of various length the child can arrange the pieces in order from shortest to tallest or smallest to biggest 9/19/2018 Y SO When H.G was given blocks of two different sizes to arrange them according to their looks, he arranged them from the shortest to the longest.
Demonstrates understanding of sequencing by putting objects in the correct positions (first, second, last) 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G was able to put puzzle of animals according to how the animal looks by putting appropriate pieces to their correct orders and placement.
Can count to 20   9/19/2018 Y SO H.G counted from 1 to 30.
Can count to 100   9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not done so; therefore, he needs practice or encouragement to reach that number.
Child identifies the numbers 1 through 10 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G identifies number from 1 to 10.
When presented with two bowls that are the exact same size and shape, the child can tell you which bowl has more or less water to demonstrate the concepts of more/less 9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not been assessed to find out his ability to associate and differentiate about more or less.
Understands the terms, dark, light, and early 9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not been tested on this.
Associates the time on a clock to his/her daily schedule (we go to school when the clock says 7) 9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not been tested on this.
Can tell time on an analog clock   9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not been tested on this activity.
When asked, child shares the purpose of a calendar (to know what day it is, to know what you have to do, etc) 9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not been tested on this activity.
Can differentiate coins (penny from nickel) 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G can differentiate them by the look, the number, and texture.
When presented with written letters (upper and lower case) the child can identify them by name and occasionally sound. 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G demonstrated this in class.
Demonstrates a beginning understanding of fractions (half) 9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not been tested on such activity.
Asks frequent questions   9/19/2018 N SO H.G is expressive; however, I have not seen him asking questions.
Appears eager and interested in learning and trying new things 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G likes drawing and interested in looking into books.
Speech and Language Development        
Has a large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words 9/19/2018 N SO H.G has not learned vocabulary to master 1500  amount of words. He will need extra devotion to reach that amount of wordings.
Speech is entirely intelligible to unfamiliar people, meaning anyone can understand almost everything the child says. 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G speaks very clearly and slowly to be understood by his audience.
When looking at a familiar book the child will tell the story 9/19/2018 N SO I did not observe H.G doing such.
Defines the function of various familiar objects (a spoon is for eating) 9/19/2018 N SO I did not find H.G doing such activity.
Names 8 colors   9/19/2018 Y SO H.G name 8 colors when he was told to do so.
Makes up jokes   9/19/2018 N SO I have not observed H.G doing such.
Speaks in sentences that are made up of 5-7 words 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G spoke in sentences that contain more than 5 words.
Can answer questions about him/herself such as his birthday, family members names … 9/19/2018 Y SO H.G can name the members of his family by names.
Uses past tense correctly for irregular and regular verbs 9/19/2018 N SO During the child’s interview H.G was not able to use correct verb in answering the questions.
Social-Emotional Development        
Has one or two “best friends”   9/19/2018 Y So During dramatic play, I saw H.G parallel and cooperative play.
Engages in cooperative play with peers 9/19/2018 Y So During play at school, H.G played alongside with his friends.
Is able to share and take turns with peers 9/19/2018 Y So During Play, H.G interacted with his friends on the regular basis.
Participates in group imaginative play 9/19/2018 Y So He and his friends were frequently involved in group imaginative play when they talked things that they did not possess.
Displays affection toward younger children and animals 9/19/2018 Y So H.G was very friendly with his peers during dramatic play and on the field.
When given directions or tasks by parents or adult caregiver(s), the child follows through (most of the time) 9/19/2018 Y So H.G follows direction in completing his works. When I gave him a piece of paper and asked him to draw anything he loves from his house, he drew his bed.
Does not request adult comfort but still needs it. 9/19/2018 N So I did not ask the parents neither do I know about this if H.G needs adult comfort.
Exhibits self-control related to emotions / less mood swings 9/19/2018 Y So I have not seen H.G showing negative emotion in class.
Demonstrates pride in accomplishments by boasting 9/19/2018 N So I have not observed such thing concerning the H.G.

OBSERVATION SUMMARY

H.G was assessed using the tool of developmental checklist. During the assessment, the total number of activities H.G was unable to perform under motor development was 6 and the total number of activities H.G was able to perform was 8. Under the perceptual-cognitive development, H.G performed 10 activities, but he was unable to perform 9 activities; meanwhile, under the speech and language development, H.G performed 4 activities and was unable to perform 5. Under the social-emotional development, H.G performed 7 and was unable to perform 2. Looking the developmental checklist of H.G, he did well in the area of social-emotional development. On motor, perceptual-cognitive, and speech and language development, the score appears on average; therefore, there are needs to strengthen these domains. For effective intervention to H.G’s problem, he needs to be encouraged to read story books, identify the beginning, the middle, and the end of the story and he should be encouraged to speak among his peers in the classroom and to redo those exercises he did perform under the motor developmental domain. This introduces him to Perceptual-cognitive exercise and therefore re-enforces his cognitive, speech and language development.

Student Observer: Jallah Koiyah

Course and section #: EDU 284-01

Child’s Initials: S.B

Date of Birth: December 29, 2013

Age in _5___Years _3___Months

Location of Observation: Shamrock Gardens Elementary

                                    3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205

Date(s)/Time/Duration of Observation: 9/19/2018/5:00 PM/60 Minutes

FIVE YEARS OLD

BEHAVIOR Date of Observation Y/N Did the child demonstrate the behavior (Y), attempt but not successfully demonstrate the behavior (N) SO/PR/TR Student Observed (SO) Parent Report (PR) Teacher Report (TR) Comments What did you observe that led you to select Y/N?   What did the parent or teacher report?
Motor Development        
Walks backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel) 9/19/2018 N SO S.B walked forward instead of walking backward.
Walks up and down stairs putting one foot on each step without holding a railing or adult hand. 9/19/2018 N SO There is no feature of such in the center for S.B to use.
Can complete a forward roll (somersault) 9/19/2018 N SO S.B did not demonstrate such exercise.
Can touch his/her toes without bending his knees 9/19/2018 N SO S.B did not intentionally demonstrate such exercise.
Demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B indeed walked on the bench situated on playground contemporary to a beam balance.
Skips by alternating his/her feet   9/19/2018 N SO S.B was not directed to do so and did not perform such exercise.
Steers a tricycle or two-wheeler with training wheels 9/19/2018 N SO There is no availability of such equipment at the facility for S.B to use.
Jumps forward 10 times   9/19/2018 Y SO S.B did jump forward 10 times.
Can balance on one foot for 10 seconds 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B balanced on one foot for 10 seconds.
When looking at a picture or model, he/she can replicate a three-dimensional structure using blocks 9/19/2018 N SO S.B did not do such.
Copies many letters and shapes when drawing 9/19/2018 N SO S.B did draw, but he did not copy letters and shapes.
Exhibits control when using a pen or pencil 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B firmly holds pencil and pen when writing or drawing.
Cuts along a line with scissors (does not have to be perfect) 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B used scissors to cut papers into pieces.
Handedness (Right or Left hand preference) has been established 9/19/2018 Y SO She uses right hand all the times instead of left hand.
Perceptual-Cognitive Development        
Can create a rectangle shape when given two triangles 9/19/2018 N SO S.B has not been tested to do so.
Using small blocks or cubes, the child can build steps 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B built steps using blocks during dramatic play.
Understands the concept of same when talking about size and shape 9/19/2018 N SO She has not been evaluated.
Categorizes objects using two dimensions (ex. color and size) 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B placed blocks together according to their sizes and matched colors.
When presented with objects of various length the child can arrange the pieces in order from shortest to tallest or smallest to biggest 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B arranged the blocks according to their sizes during block session.
Demonstrates understanding of sequencing by putting objects in the correct positions (first, second, last) 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B arranged number according to their ascending and descending orders as she was instructed.
Can count to 20   9/19/2018 Y SO S.B counted from 1 to 20 and above.
Can count to 100   9/19/2018 Y SO S.B counted from 1 to 100.
Child identifies the numbers 1 through 10 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B identified number from 1 to 10.
When presented with two bowls that are the exact same size and shape, the child can tell you which bowl has more or less water to demonstrate the concepts of more/less 9/19/2018 N SO S.B has not been tested for this.
Understands the terms, dark, light, and early 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B understands the concepts of dark, light, and early.
Associates the time on a clock to his/her daily schedule (we go to school when the clock says 7) 9/19/2018 N SO S.B could not do such.
Can tell time on an analog clock   9/19/2018 Y SO S.B tells the time on the clock hanged in the classroom.
When asked, child shares the purpose of a calendar (to know what day it is, to know what you have to do, etc) 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B associates the schedule on the activity calendar to what she needs to do or to go daily during the After School Program.
Can differentiate coins (penny from nickel) 9/19/2018 Y SO When S.B was given five cents, ten cents, and one cent, she differentiated among them.
When presented with written letters (upper and lower case) the child can identify them by name and occasionally sound. 9/19/2018 Y SO Upper and lower letters of alphabets were writing and S.B did identify them.
Demonstrates a beginning understanding of fractions (half) 9/19/2018 N SO S.B does not understand this concept.
Asks frequent questions   9/19/2018 N SO S.B did not ask frequent questions.
Appears eager and interested in learning and trying new things 9/19/2018 N SO S.B is conserved and not expressive as compared to the other students in the class.
Speech and Language Development        
Has a large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words 9/19/2018  N     SO S.B has not attained vocabulary equal to such number.
Speech is entirely intelligible to unfamiliar people, meaning anyone can understand almost everything the child says. 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B speaks very clear and her speech is understandable or intelligible to English speaking people.
When looking at a familiar book the child will tell the story 9/19/2018 N SO S.B has not been tested to verify this cognitive skill.
Defines the function of various familiar objects (a spoon is for eating) 9/19/2018 Y SO When S.B was asked to name items at home that are important to her, she named bowls, spoons, towels, beds, computers etc. and gave their functions.
Names 8 colors   9/19/2018 Y SO S.B named more than 8 colors. He has idea about primary and secondary colors.
Makes up jokes   9/19/2018 N SO S.B is not too expressive; therefore, she cannot initiate conversation or makes up jokes.
Speaks in sentences that are made up of 5-7 words 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B speaks in sentence that contains  more than five words.
Can answer questions about him/herself such as his birthday, family members names … 9/19/2018 Y SO When S.B was asked name family, she named her mother, father, and brothers.
Uses past tense correctly for irregular and regular verbs 9/19/2018 N SO I did not observe S.B doing such.
Social-Emotional Development        
Has one or two “best friends”   9/19/2018 N S0 S.B is always with one of her friends when we are out door. Both of them are always together.
Engages in cooperative play with peers 9/19/2018 Y SO Yes, sometimes, S.B can be along; however, at one time she is with group playing.
Is able to share and take turns with peers 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B is friendly; therefore, she plays with friends.
Participates in group imaginative play 9/19/2018 N SO I did not observe S.B doing such.
Displays affection toward younger children and animals 9/19/2018 Y SO S.B plays with friends.
When given directions or tasks by parents or adult caregiver(s), the child follows through (most of the time) 9/19/2018 Y SO When I asked S.B to take piece of papers to draw anything she loves at home, she followed direction and drew the material.
Does not request adult comfort but still needs it. 9/19/2018 N     SO I did not observe such about S.B
Exhibits self-control related to emotions / less mood swings 9/19/2018 Y SO I have not seen S.B showing negative emotion toward peers or teacher.
Demonstrates pride in accomplishments by boasting 9/19/2018 N SO I have not observed S.B doing such.

OBSERVATION SUMMARY

S.B was assessed using the tool of developmental checklist. During the assessment, the total number of activities S.B was unable to perform under motor development was 6 and the total number of activities S.B was able to perform was 8. Under the perceptual-cognitive development, S.B performed 11 activities, but she was unable to perform 9 activities; meanwhile, under the speech and language development, S.B performed 5 activities and was unable to perform 4. Under the social-emotional development, S.B performed 5 and was unable to perform 4. Looking the developmental checklist of S.B, the motor, perceptual-cognitive, speech and language, and social-emotional development, the score appears on average; therefore, there are needs to strengthen these domains. For effective intervention to S.B’s problem, She needs to be encouraged to read story books, identify the beginning, the middle, and the end of the story and she should be encouraged to speak among her peers in the classroom, associate with others, and to redo those exercises she did perform under the motor developmental domain. This introduces S.B to Perceptual-cognitive exercise and therefore re-enforces her cognitive, social-emotional, speech and language developments.

Student Observer: Jallah Koiyan

Course and section #: EDU 284-01

Child’s Initials: H.K

Date of Birth: May 12, 2013

Age in __5__Years __3__Months

Location of Observation: Shamrock Gardens Elementary

                                    3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205

Date(s)/Time/Duration of Observation: 9/20/2018/4:00 PM/60 Minutes

FIVE YEARS OLD

BEHAVIOR Date of Observation Y/N Did the child demonstrate the behavior (Y), attempt but not successfully demonstrate the behavior (N) SO/PR/TR Student Observed (SO) Parent Report (PR) Teacher Report (TR) Comments What did you observe that led you to select Y/N?   What did the parent or teacher report?
Motor Development        
Walks backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel) 9/20/2018 N SO H.K did actually walk forward instead of backward; probably, I did not instruct him to do so.
Walks up and down stairs putting one foot on each step without holding a railing or adult hand. 9/20/2018 N SO H.K did not perform such action because there is no feature available at center.
Can complete a forward roll (somersault) 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K completed a forward roll,  but he did not summersault.
Can touch his/her toes without bending his knees 9/20/2018 N SO H.K did not perform this action.
Demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K did walk on the bench situated on the playground instead of beam balance.
Skips by alternating his/her feet   9/20/2018 N SO H.K did not perform this action.
Steers a tricycle or two-wheeler with training wheels 9/20/2018 N SO There is no availability of such equipment at center for H.K to use.
Jumps forward 10 times   9/20/2018 N SO H.K jumped, but did not jump forward 10 times.
Can balance on one foot for 10 seconds 9/20/2018 N SO H.K did balance on his foot for a second instead of 10 seconds.
When looking at a picture or model, he/she can replicate a three-dimensional structure using blocks 9/20/2018 N SO H.K did not perform this action.
Copies many letters and shapes when drawing 9/20/2018 N SO H.K does copy letters not shapes.
Exhibits control when using a pen or pencil 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K’s hands are stable when drawing or writing. He demonstrated this when I asked him to draw something from home he loves best.
Cuts along a line with scissors (does not have to be perfect) 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K used scissors to cut pictures from the drawing book when he was asked to draw or color.
Handedness (Right or Left hand preference) has been established 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K used his right hand most of the times instead of left hand.  
Perceptual-Cognitive Development        
Can create a rectangle shape when given two triangles 9/20/2018   N SO  H.K did not perform this action.
Using small blocks or cubes, the child can build steps 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K lay blocks on each other during play at block center.
Understands the concept of same when talking about size and shape 9/20/2018 N SO H.K has not been tested on this cognitive skill.
Categorizes objects using two dimensions (ex. color and size) 9/20/2018 N SO H.K finds it difficult categorizing objects based on size and color.
When presented with objects of various length the child can arrange the pieces in order from shortest to tallest or smallest to biggest 9/20/2018 N SO H.K finds it difficult arranging objects of various lengths.
Demonstrates understanding of sequencing by putting objects in the correct positions (first, second, last) 9/20/2018 N SO H.K finds difficult arranging things according to sequencing based on the order of important.
Can count to 20   9/20/2018 Y SO H.K can count from 1 to 20.
Can count to 100   9/20/2018 Y SO H.K can count from 1 to 100.
Child identifies the numbers 1 through 10 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K can identify numbers from 1 to 10.
When presented with two bowls that are the exact same size and shape, the child can tell you which bowl has more or less water to demonstrate the concepts of more/less 9/20/2018 N SO H.K has not been tested on this cognitive skill.
Understands the terms, dark, light, and early 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K understands that dark or light represents the nature of appearance or clarity of something and early represents time factor.
Associates the time on a clock to his/her daily schedule (we go to school when the clock says 7) 9/20/2018 N SO H.K has not evaluated based on this skill.
Can tell time on an analog clock   9/20/2018 Y     SO H.K tells time on the clock hanged in the classroom.
When asked, child shares the purpose of a calendar (to know what day it is, to know what you have to do, etc) 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K explained the daily schedule when to go outside, when to transition, when to go home.
Can differentiate coins (penny from nickel) 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K knows difference between ten cents, five cents, and one cent. When he was presented these, he identified them.
When presented with written letters (upper and lower case) the child can identify them by name and occasionally sound. 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K knows upper and lower case letters of alphabets.
Demonstrates a beginning understanding of fractions (half) 9/20/2018 N SO H.K does not know fractions.
Asks frequent questions   9/20/2018 Y SO H.K asked questions on playground and in class.
Appears eager and interested in learning and trying new things 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K asked questions often of things he does not understand.
Speech and Language Development        
Has a large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words 9/20/2018 N SO H.K does not have this amount of vocabularies of known.
Speech is entirely intelligible to unfamiliar people, meaning anyone can understand almost everything the child says. 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K’s speech is clear and understandable when he speaks.
When looking at a familiar book the child will tell the story 9/20/2018 N SO H.K is not too articulate in telling  a story.
Defines the function of various familiar objects (a spoon is for eating) 9/20/2018 Y SO When H.K was asked to draw thing from home, he drew bed, pot, spoons etc.
Names 8 colors   9/20/2018 Y SO H.K knows his colors.
Makes up jokes   9/20/2018 N SO H.K does not make up jokes.
Speaks in sentences that are made up of 5-7 words 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K speaks in sentences of more than five words.
Can answer questions about him/herself such as his birthday, family members names … 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K knows the names of his mother and father.
Uses past tense correctly for irregular and regular verbs 9/20/2018 N SO H.K needs to work on this because during child’s interview, he was  not able to answer questions using correctly regular or irregular verbs.
Social-Emotional Development        
Has one or two “best friends”   9/20/2018 Y SO During play time, H.K played along with his friends.
Engages in cooperative play with peers 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K played cooperatively with his friends during dramatic play.
Is able to share and take turns with peers 9/20/2018 Y SO  
Participates in group imaginative play 9/20/2018 N SO I have not seen H.K displayed such attitude.
Displays affection toward younger children and animals 9/20/2018 Y SO He is friendly with peers and others.
When given directions or tasks by parents or adult caregiver(s), the child follows through (most of the time) 9/20/2018 Y SO When I gave H.K the task to draw whatever he sees in his house that interests him, he drew with enthusiasm.
Does not request adult comfort but still needs it. 9/20/2018 Y SO H.K enjoys being affirmed for job well done.
Exhibits self-control related to emotions / less mood swings 9/20/2018 Y SO I have not seen H.K expressed negative emotions towards peers or adults.
Demonstrates pride in accomplishments by boasting 9/20/2018 N SO I did not observe H.K exhibiting such tendency.

OBSERVATION SUMMARY

H.K was assessed using the tool of developmental checklist. During the assessment, the total number of activities H.K was unable to perform under motor development was 9 and the total number of activities H.K was able to perform was 5. Under the perceptual-cognitive development, H.K performed 11 activities, but he was unable to perform 8 activities; meanwhile, under the speech and language development, H.K performed 5 activities and was unable to perform 4. Under the social-emotional development, H.K performed 7 and was unable to perform 2. Looking the developmental checklist of H.K, he did well in the area of social-emotional development. On perceptual-cognitive and speech and language development, the score appears on average; therefore, there are needs to strengthen these domains. On motor development, he performed very poor. For effective intervention to H.K’s problem, he needs to be encouraged to read story books, identify the beginning, the middle, and the end of the story and he should be encouraged to speak among his peers in the classroom and to redo those exercises he did perform under the motor developmental domain. This introduces him to Perceptual-cognitive exercise and therefore re-enforces his cognitive, speech and language, and motor development.

Student Observer: Jallah Koiyan

Course and section #: EDU 284-01

Child’s Initials: W.F.A

Date of Birth: July 12, 2013

Age in __5__Years _3___Months

Location of Observation: Shamrock Gardens Elementary

                                    3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205

Date(s)/Time/Duration of Observation: 9/21/2018/5:00 PM/60 Minutes

FIVE YEARS OLD

BEHAVIOR Date of Observation Y/N Did the child demonstrate the behavior (Y), attempt but not successfully demonstrate the behavior (N) SO/PR/TR Student Observed (SO) Parent Report (PR) Teacher Report (TR) Comments What did you observe that led you to select Y/N?   What did the parent or teacher report?
Motor Development        
Walks backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel) 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A walked forward instead of backward.
Walks up and down stairs putting one foot on each step without holding a railing or adult hand. 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A did not perform this action because such feature is not available at center.
Can complete a forward roll (somersault) 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A completed a forward roll, but he did not summersault.
Can touch his/her toes without bending his knees 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A did not perform this exercise.
Demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A walked on the bench situated at playground.
Skips by alternating his/her feet   9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A did not perform this exercise.
Steers a tricycle or two-wheeler with training wheels 9/21/2018 N SO This equipment is not available on playground.
Jumps forward 10 times   9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A jumped forward, but did not jump ten times.
Can balance on one foot for 10 seconds 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A did not balance on his foot for ten seconds.
When looking at a picture or model, he/she can replicate a three-dimensional structure using blocks 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A did not perform this task.
Copies many letters and shapes when drawing 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A did not perform this task.
Exhibits control when using a pen or pencil 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A has control over the use of pencil or pen when writing.
Cuts along a line with scissors (does not have to be perfect) 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A can use scissors to cut papers.
Handedness (Right or Left hand preference) has been established 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A uses his right hand.
Perceptual-Cognitive Development        
Can create a rectangle shape when given two triangles 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A is not able to create such shape when given two triangles.
Using small blocks or cubes, the child can build steps 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A can build blocks or cubes together during play.
Understands the concept of same when talking about size and shape 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A has not been tested on such cognitive exercise.
Categorizes objects using two dimensions (ex. color and size) 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A has not been tested on this exercise.
When presented with objects of various length the child can arrange the pieces in order from shortest to tallest or smallest to biggest 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A has not been tested on this exercise.
Demonstrates understanding of sequencing by putting objects in the correct positions (first, second, last) 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A arranged playing card according to flowers and numbers.
Can count to 20   9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A can count from 1 to 20.
Can count to 100   9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A was not able to count from 1 to 100.
Child identifies the numbers 1 through 10 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A did identify 1 through 10.
When presented with two bowls that are the exact same size and shape, the child can tell you which bowl has more or less water to demonstrate the concepts of more/less 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A has not been evaluated with respect to  such exercise.
Understands the terms, dark, light, and early 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A does not understand these terms and applications.
Associates the time on a clock to his/her daily schedule (we go to school when the clock says 7) 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A has not been tested on this exercise.
Can tell time on an analog clock   9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A tells the time on the clock hanged in the classroom.
When asked, child shares the purpose of a calendar (to know what day it is, to know what you have to do, etc) 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A does not know this.
Can differentiate coins (penny from nickel) 9/21/2018 N SO       W.F.A knows the difference between the ten cents, five cents, and one cent.
When presented with written letters (upper and lower case) the child can identify them by name and occasionally sound. 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A knows lower and upper case letters in the alphabets.
Demonstrates a beginning understanding of fractions (half) 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A does not know the beginning understanding of fractions.
Asks frequent questions   9/21/2018 N SO I did not observe W.F.A asking questions.
Appears eager and interested in learning and trying new things 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A appears introverted in the classroom situation.
Speech and Language Development        
Has a large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A does not have large vocabulary enrichment according to this figure.
Speech is entirely intelligible to unfamiliar people, meaning anyone can understand almost everything the child says. 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A’s speech is clear.
When looking at a familiar book the child will tell the story 9/21/2018 N SO I did not observe W.F.A perform such task.
Defines the function of various familiar objects (a spoon is for eating) 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A knows what a spoon is used for and what a bowl is used for when prompted.
Names 8 colors   9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A can name colors up to 8.
Makes up jokes   9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A cannot make up jokes.
Speaks in sentences that are made up of 5-7 words 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A uses words in sentences more than five.
Can answer questions about him/herself such as his birthday, family members names … 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A knows the name of his father and mother.
Uses past tense correctly for irregular and regular verbs 9/21/2018 N SO W.F.A does not use past regular and irregular verbs when speaking. I observed this when I interviewed him.
Social-Emotional Development        
Has one or two “best friends”   9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A plays alongside with friends during dramatic play and outdoor play.
Engages in cooperative play with peers 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A plays with friends during dramatic play and outdoor play.
Is able to share and take turns with peers 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A understands when he is asked to allow his friend use items before him.
Participates in group imaginative play 9/21/2018 Y SO I observed W.F.A in such symbolic play with friends.
Displays affection toward younger children and animals 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A is friendly with younger children of his peer group.
When given directions or tasks by parents or adult caregiver(s), the child follows through (most of the time) 9/21/2018 Y SO When I asked W.F.A to draw something from home he likes the most, he did exactly as he was asked.
Does not request adult comfort but still needs it. 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A indeed needs adult comfort.
Exhibits self-control related to emotions / less mood swings 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A does not exhibit negative emotion toward peers.
Demonstrates pride in accomplishments by boasting 9/21/2018 Y SO W.F.A likes to be affirmed when he has done something well.

OBSERVATION SUMMARY

W.F.A was assessed using the tool of developmental checklist. During the assessment, the total number of activities W.F.A was unable to perform under motor development was 7 and the total number of activities W.F.A was able to perform was 7. Under the perceptual-cognitive development, W.F.A performed 6 activities, but he was unable to perform 13 activities; meanwhile, under the speech and language development, W.F.A performed 5 activities and was unable to perform 4. Under the social-emotional development, W.F.A performed 9 and was unable to perform 0. Looking the developmental checklist of W.F.A he did well in the area of social-emotional development. On motor and speech and language development, the score appears on average; therefore, there are needs to strengthen these domains. W.F.A’s weakness lies in the area of perceptual-cognitive development. For effective intervention to W.F.A’s problem, he needs to be encouraged to read story books, identify the beginning, the middle, and the end of the story and he should be encouraged to speak among his peers in the classroom and to redo those exercises he did perform under the motor developmental domain. This introduces him to Perceptual-cognitive exercise and therefore re-enforces his cognitive, speech and language, motor development.

Student Observer: Jallah Koiyan

Course and section #: EDU 284-01

Child’s Initials: A.H

Date of Birth: May 9, 2013

Age in _5___Years __5__Months

Location of Observation: Shamrock Gardens Elementary

                                    3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205

Date(s)/Time/Duration of Observation: 9/21/2018/4:00 PM/60 Minutes

FIVE YEARS OLD

BEHAVIOR Date of Observation Y/N Did the child demonstrate the behavior (Y), attempt but not successfully demonstrate the behavior (N) SO/PR/TR Student Observed (SO) Parent Report (PR) Teacher Report (TR) Comments What did you observe that led you to select Y/N?   What did the parent or teacher report?
Motor Development        
Walks backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel) 9/21/2018 N SO He did not walk backward; instead, he walked forward.
Walks up and down stairs putting one foot on each step without holding a railing or adult hand. 9/21/2018 N SO The facility does not have such feature.
Can complete a forward roll (somersault) 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H can move forward or complete  a forward roll, but he cannot summersault.
Can touch his/her toes without bending his knees 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not perform this exercise.
Demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H walked on the bench situated on the playground.
Skips by alternating his/her feet   9/21/2018 N SO A.H did not perform this task.
Steers a tricycle or two-wheeler with training wheels 9/21/2018 N SO This equipment is not available at the facility for A.H to use.
Jumps forward 10 times   9/21/2018 N SO A.H did not perform this task.
Can balance on one foot for 10 seconds 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H can balance on one foot for two seconds instead ten seconds.
When looking at a picture or model, he/she can replicate a three-dimensional structure using blocks 9/21/2018 N SO A.H did not perform this task.
Copies many letters and shapes when drawing 9/21/2018 N SO A.H did not perform this task.
Exhibits control when using a pen or pencil 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H uses pencils or pens well when writing or drawing.
Cuts along a line with scissors (does not have to be perfect) 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H uses scissors when cutting paper. He used the scissors when I asked him to draw something from home he likes the most.
Handedness (Right or Left hand preference) has been established 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H uses his right hand the most.
Perceptual-Cognitive Development        
Can create a rectangle shape when given two triangles 9/21/2018 N SO A.H did not perform this task.
Using small blocks or cubes, the child can build steps 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H can build blocks.
Understands the concept of same when talking about size and shape 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not understand this concept.
Categorizes objects using two dimensions (ex. color and size) 9/21/2018 Y         SO A.H can differentiate objects according to colors and sizes. When I asked him to arrange the blocks according to their lengths, he did exactly what he was asked to do.
When presented with objects of various length the child can arrange the pieces in order from shortest to tallest or smallest to biggest 9/21/2018 Y SO When I asked A.H to arrange the blocks according their lengths, he did it.
Demonstrates understanding of sequencing by putting objects in the correct positions (first, second, last) 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H arranged the puzzle according to picture outlook.
Can count to 20   9/21/2018 Y SO A.H can count from 1 to 20.
Can count to 100   9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not count to 100.
Child identifies the numbers 1 through 10 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H can identify 1 through 10.
When presented with two bowls that are the exact same size and shape, the child can tell you which bowl has more or less water to demonstrate the concepts of more/less 9/21/2018 N SO A.H has not been tested on these concepts.
Understands the terms, dark, light, and early 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not understand this concept.
Associates the time on a clock to his/her daily schedule (we go to school when the clock says 7) 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not know this association of schedule with his activity.
Can tell time on an analog clock   9/21/2018 Y SO A.H tells time on the clock hanged on the wall in the classroom.
When asked, child shares the purpose of a calendar (to know what day it is, to know what you have to do, etc) 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not know this concept.
Can differentiate coins (penny from nickel) 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H knows the difference among ten cents, five cents and one cent.
When presented with written letters (upper and lower case) the child can identify them by name and occasionally sound. 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H knows lower and upper case letters in the alphabets.
Demonstrates a beginning understanding of fractions (half) 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not know fractions.
Asks frequent questions   9/21/2018 N SO I did not observe A.H asking questions.
Appears eager and interested in learning and trying new things 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H was eager in asking questions when asked him to draw something from home he likes the best.
Speech and Language Development        
Has a large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not show to have the number of words of vocabulary enrichment.
Speech is entirely intelligible to unfamiliar people, meaning anyone can understand almost everything the child says. 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H speaks very clearly for the understanding of everyone to understand based on my observation; however, since it is difficult to measure knowledge, I cannot generally conclude that everyone could understand him when he speaks.
When looking at a familiar book the child will tell the story 9/21/2018 N SO I did not test A.H on this neither did I give him a book to read.
Defines the function of various familiar objects (a spoon is for eating) 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H knows the functions of objects at home such spoons, bowls etc.
Names 8 colors   9/21/2018 Y SO A.H knows colors and can name color up to 8.
Makes up jokes   9/21/2018 N SO I did not observe A.H making up jokes.
Speaks in sentences that are made up of 5-7 words 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H speaks in sentences containing more than five words.
Can answer questions about him/herself such as his birthday, family members names … 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H knows the name of his Father and Mother.
Uses past tense correctly for irregular and regular verbs 9/21/2018 N SO A.H does not often use past tense especially when it comes to irregular verbs.
Social-Emotional Development        
Has one or two “best friends”   9/21/2018 Y SO A.H has more friends or he is friendly.
Engages in cooperative play with peers 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H played cooperatively with friends during play time.
Is able to share and take turns with peers 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H understands how to be tolerant with peers.
Participates in group imaginative play 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H participates in group imaginative play during in the classroom or outdoor.
Displays affection toward younger children and animals 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H is friendly with peers; however, I have not observed him showing affection to animals.
When given directions or tasks by parents or adult caregiver(s), the child follows through (most of the time) 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H followed direction when I asked him to draw something from home he likes the most.
Does not request adult comfort but still needs it. 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H does not required adult comfort; however, he still needs it.
Exhibits self-control related to emotions / less mood swings 9/21/2018 Y SO I have not observed A.H being angry before or showing negative emotion to others.
Demonstrates pride in accomplishments by boasting 9/21/2018 Y SO A.H likes to be affirmed when he has done well.

OBSERVATION SUMMARY

A.H was assessed using the tool of developmental checklist. During the assessment, the total number of activities A.H was unable to perform under motor development was 8 and the total number of activities A.H was able to perform was 6. Under the perceptual-cognitive development, A.H performed 10 activities, but he was unable to perform 9 activities; meanwhile, under the speech and language development, A.H performed 5 activities and was unable to perform 4. Under the social-emotional development, A.H performed 9 and was unable to perform 0. Looking the developmental checklist of A.H, he did well in the area of social-emotional development. On motor, perceptual-cognitive, and speech and language development, the score appears on average; therefore, there are needs to strengthen these domains. His strength lies in social-emotional development area. For effective intervention to A.H’s problem, he needs to be encouraged to read story books, identify the beginning, the middle, and the end of the story and he should be encouraged to speak among his peers in the classroom and to redo those exercises he did perform under the motor developmental domain. This introduces him to Perceptual-cognitive exercise and therefore re-enforces his cognitive, motor, speech and language development.

Anecdotal Records Reporting Form

Child’s Name (H.G)   Child’s Date of Birth and Age (in years and months): 2/22/2013 and 5 years and 6 months        (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B)
Observation Date and Time: 10/9/2018 and 4:00 PM   Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)         Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205  
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year)   Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Anecdote 1 Checklist item: (copy the item directly from the checklist)   H.G said, “I like the keyboard aa-aa-aaa. If anything was there. What in the head? It is black. Why not draw it now? You going to use brown color?”
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on above anecdotes, explain clearly what the anecdotes tell you about the child’s development in each domain. Be very specific and use examples.   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, H.G has fine motor development because he was able to hold the pencil firmly and tightly while he drew the object he was asked to draw. He was asked to draw something from home he likes the most. Secondly, he moves, jumps, and runs on the playground and in the classroom. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, H.G still has problem constructing sentences with correct grammatical structure. His speech lacks good grammar; therefore, there is need to introduce to him book readings and sight words so he can master them. __Language: Based on this domain, H.G still needs to work on his language construction looking at the exact words he has used in his sentences. He still stubbles in his speech as I listened to him. __Social: Based on this domain, he played with his friends at the dramatic play center in the sociable and cooperative manner. __Emotional: Based on this domain, H.G has no problem with friends at the center. He is friendly with others and has shown no indicative that he has emotional problem.      

Anecdotal Records Reporting Form

Child’s Name (S.B)   Child’s Date of Birth and Age (in years and months): 12/29/2013 and 5 years and 3 months     (*Optional) Child’s Gender Girl (G)  
Observation Date and Time: 10/9/2018 and 4:45 PM   Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)         Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205    
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Anecdote 2 Checklist item: (copy the item directly from the checklist)   S.B said, “I like the starting point. I can make it for the first time. Sometimes I can draw. You can take a piece of paper.”
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on above anecdotes, explain clearly what he anecdotes tell you about the child’s development in each domain. Be very specific and use examples.   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, S.B has good fine motor skill because she was able to hold the pencil firmly and tightly while she drew the object she likes the most from home. Despite of the fine motor skill, she also moves, jumps, and skits on the playground. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, S.B spoke good sentence structure observing grammatical area unconsciously. Her sentences are all grammatically correct. __Language: Based on this domain, S.B articulates well when it comes to speaking. Her language is in line with her development. __Social: Based on this domain, S.B is sociable; on the contrary, she seems to be a quiet person or introverted. __Emotional: Based on this domain, S.B has no problem with emotion and she plays well with friends, takes turns, and looks very intelligent.      

Anecdotal Records Reporting Form

Child’s Name (H.K)   Child’s Date of Birth and Age (in years and months): 5/12/2013 and 5 years and 3 months     (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B) /Girl (G)  
Observation Date and Time:10/9/2018 and 5:00 PM   Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)         Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205    
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Anecdote 3 Checklist item: (copy the item directly from the checklist)   H.K said, “Eye is red. I am explaining under water. It is not really fair. He is under water. Color it. He is not in the middle at all. I color it with red. Oh! My God. What hold on? Mr. Jal can we do it now? Mr. Jal what not? Let’s.” 
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on above anecdotes, explain clearly what the anecdotes tell you about the child’s development in each domain. Be very specific and use examples.   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, H.K has fine motor skill because he was able to hold the pencil to draw something from home he likes best. On the other hand, he also has good gross motor development because he runs, jumps, and skits while on the playground. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, H.K needs some help in following direction. When he was told to draw something from home, it was difficult for him to follow direction; therefore, instead of drawing something from home which he did not do, he was instructed to color picture from the picture book to represent something he love from home. __Language: Based on this domain, H.K articulates well when it comes to speaking. He was very talkative during play with his friend at the centers. __Social: Based on this domain, H.K is very sociable because he is always with friends keeping conversation during play ground hours. __Emotional: Based on this domain, H.K has no emotional problem like refusal to take turns with friends or being angry with friends that leads to fighting.      

Anecdotal Records Reporting Form

Child’s Name (W.F.A)   Child’s Date of Birth and Age (in years and months): 7/17/2013 and 5 years and 3 months     (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B)
Observation Date and Time: 10/10/2018 and 4:00 PM   Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)         Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205      
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Anecdote 4 Checklist item: (copy the item directly from the checklist)   W.F.A said, “Henry, look at this. We can color. I just color it. There an pencil and paint brush. Yes like us color it with red. What did you say what?
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on above anecdotes, explain clearly what the anecdotes tell you about the child’s development in each domain. Be very specific and use examples.   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, W.F.A was able to hold the pencil firmly and tightly in order to draw something from home he likes the most. Besides the good fine motor skill, W.F.A runs, jumps, and skits while on the playground. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, W.F.A has problem recognizing sight words and following directions. __Language: Based on this domain, W.F.A is very articulate in keeping conversation with friends during free play. __Social: Based on this domain, W.F.A is sociable in the classroom and on the playground. He is always involved in cooperative play during play time. __Emotional: Based on this domain, W.F.A has not shown any negative emotion towards teacher, peers, and he is flexible, tolerant, and considerate with friends.      

Anecdotal Records Reporting Form

Child’s Name (A.H)   Child’s Date of Birth and Age (in years and months):5/9/2013 and 5 years and 5 months     (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B)
Observation Date and Time: 10/10/2018 and 4:45 PM   Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)         Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205      
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Anecdote 5 Checklist item: (copy the item directly from the checklist)   A.H said, “He color his own. We not get picture. One for them and one for all. Mr. J this has black mark on it. Oh! Oh! the donkey. Anybody has red? I need red.”
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on above anecdotes, explain clearly what the anecdotes tell you about the child’s development in each domain. Be very specific and use examples.   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, A.H grasped the pencil firmly and tightly during art activity when he was asked to draw something from home he likes the best; in this light, he has good fine motor skill. During outdoor activity, he runs, jumps, plays soccer, and skits. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, A.H reads at home according to his mother. He was able to cognitively reason in his mind to produce an object he likes the most at home when he was asked to do so. __Language: Based on this domain, A.H still needs to practice speaking to enable him articulate well. He has problem with articulation. One can see this even in his anecdotal recording. The words in the anecdotal record are the exact words of A.H. __Social: Based on this domain, A.H is friendly and likes to be among his peers. This can be seemed in the dramatic play environment when he is involved in parallel or cooperative play. __Emotional: Based on this domain, A.H has no emotional problem as I have observed him in the classroom and on the playground. He takes turn with peers.      

Running Record Reporting Form

Child’s Name (H.G)   Child’s Age (in years and months): 5 years and 6 months   Child’s Date of Birth: 2/22/2013 (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B)
Observation Date and Time: 10/9/2018 and 4:00 PM     Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)     Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205  
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Observation Notes 1     During my of observation of H.G at the above mentioned center on the stipulated date, the following incidence actually occurred as the two children played paralleled. H.G and his friend, W.F.A were playing parallel adjacent to the dramatic play center of the classroom. Both of them have gone to the Art center to take drawing papers and crayons. W.F.A has just taken the keyboard from the dramatic play environment and was carrying with him. At this time, H.G was interested in the keyboard and wanted to draw picture of it and therefore asked W.F.A what color he was going to use to color the drawing. He asked, “You going to use brown color?” During the parallel play between the two children, each of them indeed expressed his thought to each other through verbalization of words. In their interactions, the two children were focused on their play as they played parallel. What I observed as I listened to the children is that both of them did not speak grammatical or well constructed sentences; instead, they used fragmented sentences and phrases that can be understood by them based on their level of education.
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on your observation notes, explain clearly what you know the child’s development in each domain. Note – although you observed an activity geared toward social interaction and cognitive development you should still be able to make connections to the other areas of development!   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, H.G has fine motor development because he was able to hold the pencil firmly and tightly while he drew the object he was asked to draw. He was asked to draw something from home he likes the most. Secondly, he moves, jumps, and runs on the playground and in the classroom.   __Cognitive: Based on this domain, H.G still has problem constructing sentences with correct grammatical structure. His speech lacks good grammar; therefore, there is need to introduce to him book readings and sight words so he can master them.   __Language: Based on this domain, H.G still needs to work on his language construction looking at the exact words he has used in his sentences. He still stubbles in his speech as I listened to him. __Social: Based on this domain, he played with his friends at the dramatic play center in the sociable and cooperative manner. __Emotional: Based on this domain, H.G has no problem with friends at the center. He is friendly with others and has shown no indicative that he has emotional problem.
  Summary       After completing this observation please answer the following questions and summarize what you learned about the child from this observation. What are some of the child’s strengths? Areas of weakness? Did you see any “teachable moments” where you could have built on (think scaffolding) his/her development?   H.G, socially, is friendly with friends and emotionally, he has not shown any negative emotion in the classroom neither has he been referred for wrong behavior in the After School Enrichment Program. He has fine and gross motor skill on average based on the developmental checklist observation tool used. He has problem with articulation and the use of correct grammar and he stumbles when he speaks. Based on this observation, H.G can be helped to remedy the deficiency in his perceptive-cognitive and speech and language developments by the introduction of books reading, sight words, and encouraging him to speak among his peers in the classroom settings and other environments rich for learning.

Running Record Reporting Form

Child’s Name (S.B)   Child’s Age (in years and months): 5 years and 3 months Child’s Date of Birth: 12/29/2013 (*Optional) Child’s Gender /Girl (G)
Observation Date and Time: 10/9/2018 and 4:45 PM     Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)     Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205  
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Observation Notes 2     During my observation of S.B on the stipulated date, the following incidence actually occurred as I observed S.B: S.B and A.H, who were engrossed in cooperative play near the Art center, had gone to take drawing papers, crayons, and pencils to draw. S.B who is a girl has decided to draw herself after she was asked to draw something from home she likes the best. She started the drawing after A.H had told her that she could find a piece of papers with other equipment feasible for drawing and materials needed to produce the portray of herself. When I interviewed S.B’s grandmother, one of the things she mentioned about S.B was that her granddaughter said that her granddaughter is very creative and she creates things that give inspiration to people who view them. After the production of the portray, one cannot imagine if a five year old child could produce such picture of herself. The picture indeed resembles her.
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on your observation notes, explainclearlywhatyou know the child’s development in each domain. Note – although you observed an activity geared toward social interaction and cognitive development you should still be able to make connections to the other areas of development!   __Physical/Motor: : Based on this domain, S.B has good fine motor skill because she was able to hold the pencil firmly and tightly while she drew the object she likes the most from home. Despite of the fine motor skill, she also moves, jumps, and skits on the playground.   __Cognitive: Based on this domain, S.B spoke good sentence structure observing grammatical area unconsciously. Her sentences are all grammatically correct. __Language: Based on this domain, S.B articulates well when it comes to speaking. Her language is in line with her development. __Social: Based on this domain, S.B is sociable; on the contrary, she seems to be a quiet person or introverted. __Emotional: Based on this domain, S.B has no problem with emotion and she plays well with friends, takes turns, and looks very intelligent.  
  Summary       After completing this observation please answer the following questions and summarize what you learned about the child from this observation. What are some of the child’s strengths? Areas of weakness? Did you see any “teachable moments” where you could have built on (think scaffolding) his/her development?   Based on the on the observation of S.B, she spoke good sentence structure observing grammatical rule. Her sentences are short; however, they contain elements sentence should contain. On the other hand, based on the developmental checklist of S.B, she scored on average on perceptual-cognitive, speech and language development; therefore, introducing books readings to S.B will help sharpen the language and perceptual-cognitive development enforcement.

Running Record Reporting Form

Child’s Name (H.K)   Child’s Age (in years and months): 5 years and 3 months   Child’s Date of Birth: 5/12/2013 (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B)
Observation Date and Time: 10/9/2018 and 5:00 PM     Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)     Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205  
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Observation Notes 3     H.K and his friend have gone to the Art center to take drawing papers after having been asked to draw something from homes. H.K looks at his friend’s picture and describes his friend’s photo as under water. What I have observed about this incidence is that when children are learning to speak, some do not speak in complete sentences based on their language development.
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on your observation notes, explainclearlywhatyou know the child’s development in each domain. Note – although you observed an activity geared toward social interaction and cognitive development you should still be able to make connections to the other areas of development!   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, H.K has fine motor skill because he was able to hold the pencil to draw something from home he likes best. On the other hand, he also has good gross motor development because he runs, jumps, and skits while on the playground. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, H.K needs some help in following direction. When he was told to draw something from home, it was difficult for him to follow direction; therefore, instead of drawing something from home which he did not do, he was instructed to color picture from the picture book to represent something he loves from home. __Language: Based on this domain, H.K articulates well when it comes to speaking. He was very talkative during play with his friend at the centers. __Social: Based on this domain, H.K is very sociable because he is always with friends keeping conversation during play ground hours. __Emotional: Based on this domain, H.K has no emotional problem like refusal to take turns with friends or being angry with friends that leads to fighting.  
  Summary       After completing this observation please answer the following questions and summarize what you learned about the child from this observation. What are some of the child’s strengths? Areas of weakness? Did you see any “teachable moments” where you could have built on (think scaffolding) his/her development?     Based on this observation, H.K has fine motor development, he articulates well in term of speaking; therefore, his language development is on average. He is also sociable and he indicates no negative emotion; however, on his perceptual-cognitive  and language developmental skills, he scored on average and observing and listening to him, introducing books reading and sight words will help re-enforce his perceptual-cognitive, speech, and language developments.

Running Record Reporting Form

Child’s Name (W.F.A)   Child’s Age (in years and months): 5 years and 3 months   Child’s Date of Birth: 7/17/2013 (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B)
Observation Date and Time: 10/10/2018 and 4:00 PM     Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)     Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205  
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Observation Notes 4     W.F.A said, “Henry, look at this. We can color. I just color it. There an pencil and paint brush. Yes like us color it with red. What did you say what?”.   The above paragraph is the conversation between H.K and W.F.A. W.F.A is concentrating on what to draw after he has been asked to draw something from home he loves best. He is given a piece of paper along with a pencil and crayons to draw. W.F.A is concentrating what to draw; suddenly, he gets disoriented and frustrated of what to draw; nevertheless, he was able to draw the item in the midst of his frustration. During the parent’s interview, the mother said that she is concerned about him being frustrated when problem becomes difficult for him to solve he gets frustrated easily.  
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on your observation notes, explainclearlywhatyou know the child’s development in each domain. Note – although you observed an activity geared toward social interaction and cognitive development you should still be able to make connections to the other areas of development!   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, W.F.A was able to hold the pencil firmly and tightly in order to draw something from home he likes the most. Besides the good fine motor skill, W.F.A runs, jumps, and skits while on the playground. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, W.F.A has problem recognizing sight words and following directions. __Language: Based on this domain, W.F.A is very articulate in keeping conversation with friends during free play. __Social: Based on this domain, W.F.A is sociable in the classroom and on the playground. He is always involved in cooperative play during play time. __Emotional: Based on this domain, W.F.A has not shown any negative emotion towards teacher, peers, and he is flexible, tolerant, and considerate with friends. .  
  Summary       After completing this observation please answer the following questions and summarize what you learned about the child from this observation. What are some of the child’s strengths? Areas of weakness? Did you see any “teachable moments” where you could have built on (think scaffolding) his/her development?   Based on the observation conducted on W.F.A, he has good fine motor skill development because during the drawing period, he grasped the pencil and crayon firmly with hand-eye coordination while he drew. He also articulated well during conversation with peers. He is sociable; however, he has challenges in recognizing sight words and reading story books. The introduction of sight words and reading of story books by him will help re-enforce his perceptual-cognitive development.  

Running Record Reporting Form

Child’s Name (A.H)   Child’s Age (in years and months): 5 years and 5 months   Child’s Date of Birth: 5/9/2013   (*Optional) Child’s Gender Boy(B)
Observation Date and Time: 10/10/2018 and 4:45 PM     Location (Name of Center, School, Home, Church, Others…)     Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205  
Observer (Your Full Name/Course/Section Number/Semester/Year) Jallah Yelorbah Koiyan/EDU 284-01/Fall 2018
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission   Yes  
Observation Notes 5     A.H and H.G are involved in cooperative play at the center situated in the classroom environment. Both of them are drawing pictures of different objectives. They are conversing and promising that after drawing their objectives, they will share the drawing with the teacher and friends. H.G wanted crayons instead of markers and he therefore asked the teacher to show him which color he could use on his drawing. Both of them are involved discussing what kind of objects they could draw from homes based on the instruction the teacher has given them; however, they finally arrived at what they were going to draw and eventually produced them.      
Connecting with Developmental Domains   Based on your observation notes, explain clearly what you know the child’s development in each domain. Note – although you observed an activity geared toward social interaction and cognitive development you should still be able to make connections to the other areas of development!   __Physical/Motor: Based on this domain, A.H grasped the pencil firmly and tightly during art activity when he was asked to draw something from home he likes the best; in this light, he has good fine motor skill. During outdoor activity, he runs, jumps, plays soccer, and skits. __Cognitive: Based on this domain, A.H reads at home according to his mother. He was able to cognitively reason in his mind to produce an object he likes the most at home when he was asked to do so. __Language: Based on this domain, A.H still needs to practice speaking to enable him articulate well. He has problem with articulation. One can see this even in his anecdotal recording. The words in the anecdotal record are the exact words of A.H. __Social: Based on this domain, A.H is friendly and likes to be among his peers. This can be seemed in the dramatic play environment when he is involved in parallel or cooperative play. __Emotional: Based on this domain, A.H has no emotional problem as I have observed him in the classroom and on the playground. He takes turn with peers.  
  Summary       After completing this observation please answer the following questions and summarize what you learned about the child from this observation. What are some of the child’s strengths? Areas of weakness? Did you see any “teachable moments” where you could have built on (think scaffolding) his/her development?   The information obtained through observation from the anecdotal recording and the developmental checklist, A.H has fine motor skill development based on this psychomotor assessment, emotionally he is fine, and socially as well; however, his perceptual-cognitive, speech and language development need to be re-enforced by introducing him to books reading and encouraging him to speak among his friends during classroom situation. His sociability eventually will help also to re-enforce his speech and language development since he likes to associate with peers.

Consent to Observe a Child – EDU 284: Capstone Practicum

Dear Parent/Guardian and/or Teacher/Administrator:

My name is ___Jallah Koiyan______________________________.  I am a student at Central Piedmont Community College.

I am currently enrolled in the course, EDU 284 – Capstone Practicum.  As part of the requirements for this course, I am conducting a study of young children.  The purpose of the assignment is to gain experience conducting systematic observations of a young child through various tools.  I would like to request permission to study your child/student.  The study makes use of one or more brief behavioral observations.  No formal standardized tests or assessments (e.g., school achievement tests, personality or intelligence tests) will be administered.

I may take photographs of your child/student during the art activity; these photos will be shared only with my instructor.  Your child’s/student’s participation is entirely voluntary and he/she may withdraw from participation at any time.

Confidentiality will be protected.  Your child/student will be identified by his/her initials in documents submitted to my instructor.  If you have any questions about this assignment, please contact my instructor Susan Butler-Staub, at 704-330-4761 or Susan.ButlerStaub@cpcc.edu

Thank you.

I, ____Molly_________________________________ (parent’s/guardian’s name), give permission for my child, ___H.G____________________ (child’s initials), date of birth (DOB)                  2/22/2013        to participate in the

EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Parent’s/guardian’s signature ___Molly__________________________________        

Date __10/9/2018______________

I, _______Chatmon Kimberly_______________________________________ (teacher’s/director’s/principal’s name), give permission for my student, _____________H.G_____________ (child’s initials), to participate in the EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Teacher’s/director’s/principal’s signature __Kimberly Chatmon_____________________

Date ___10/9/2018______________

I, ___Jallah Koiyan______________________________ (CPCC student’s name), have obtained verbal consent from the above-named child.  The observation will take place at _________3301 Country club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205______________________________ (complete address of observation site – e.g., DAP Child Development Center, 123 Main Street, Charlotte, NC 12345).  The telephone number of the school/center is ___980-343-6440_______________ (complete telephone number of participating center/school – e.g., 704 123 4567).

CPCC student’s signature __Jallah Koiyan______________________________________      

Date _____10/9/2018____________

Consent to Observe a Child – EDU 284: Capstone Practicum

Dear Parent/Guardian and/or Teacher/Administrator:

My name is ____Jallah Koiyan_____________________________.  I am a student at Central Piedmont Community College.

I am currently enrolled in the course, EDU 284 – Capstone Practicum.  As part of the requirements for this course, I am conducting a study of young children.  The purpose of the assignment is to gain experience conducting systematic observations of a young child through various tools.  I would like to request permission to study your child/student.  The study makes use of one or more brief behavioral observations.  No formal standardized tests or assessments (e.g., school achievement tests, personality or intelligence tests) will be administered.

I may take photographs of your child/student during the art activity; these photos will be shared only with my instructor.  Your child’s/student’s participation is entirely voluntary and he/she may withdraw from participation at any time.

Confidentiality will be protected.  Your child/student will be identified by his/her initials in documents submitted to my instructor.  If you have any questions about this assignment, please contact my instructor Susan Butler-Staub, at 704-330-4761 or Susan.ButlerStaub@cpcc.edu

Thank you.

I, _____Erin Balthasar________________________________ (parent’s/guardian’s name), give permission for my child, ___S.B____________________ (child’s initials), date of birth (DOB)                     12/29/2013      to participate in the

EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Parent’s/guardian’s signature ___Erin Balthasar______________________________

Date ______10/9/2018__________

I, _______Chatmon Kimberly_______________________________________ (teacher’s/director’s/principal’s name), give permission for my student, ___________S.B_______________ (child’s initials), to participate in the EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Teacher’s/director’s/principal’s signature ____Chatmon Kimberly_____________

Date ___10/9/2018______________

I, ________Jallah Koiyan_________________________ (CPCC student’s name), have obtained verbal consent from the above-named child.  The observation will take place at _____________3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205__________________________ (complete address of observation site – e.g., DAP Child Development Center, 123 Main Street, Charlotte, NC 12345).  The telephone number of the school/center is ____980-343-6440______________ (complete telephone number of participating center/school – e.g., 704 123 4567).

CPCC student’s signature ____Jallah__Koiyan__________________________________       

Date ___10/9/2018______________

Consent to Observe a Child – EDU 284: Capstone Practicum

Dear Parent/Guardian and/or Teacher/Administrator:

My name is ___Jallah Koiyan______________________________.  I am a student at Central Piedmont Community College.

I am currently enrolled in the course, EDU 284 – Capstone Practicum.  As part of the requirements for this course, I am conducting a study of young children.  The purpose of the assignment is to gain experience conducting systematic observations of a young child through various tools.  I would like to request permission to study your child/student.  The study makes use of one or more brief behavioral observations.  No formal standardized tests or assessments (e.g., school achievement tests, personality or intelligence tests) will be administered.

I may take photographs of your child/student during the art activity; these photos will be shared only with my instructor.  Your child’s/student’s participation is entirely voluntary and he/she may withdraw from participation at any time.

Confidentiality will be protected.  Your child/student will be identified by his/her initials in documents submitted to my instructor.  If you have any questions about this assignment, please contact my instructor Susan Butler-Staub, at 704-330-4761 or Susan.ButlerStaub@cpcc.edu

Thank you.

I, ____Jaime Kellerhagen_________________________________ (parent’s/guardian’s name), give permission for my child, ________H.K_______________ (child’s initials), date of birth (DOB)  5/12/2013                    to participate in the

EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Parent’s/guardian’s signature __Jaime_____________________________        

Date __10/9/2018______________

I, __________Chatmon Kimberly____________________________________ (teacher’s/director’s/principal’s name), give permission for my student, __________H.K________________ (child’s initials), to participate in the EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Teacher’s/director’s/principal’s signature __Chatmon Kimberly_______         

Date ____10/9/2018_____________

I, _________Jallah Koiyan________________________ (CPCC student’s name), have obtained verbal consent from the above-named child.  The observation will take place at _____3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205__________________________________ (complete address of observation site – e.g., DAP Child Development Center, 123 Main Street, Charlotte, NC 12345).  The telephone number of the school/center is _980-343-6440_________________ (complete telephone number of participating center/school – e.g., 704 123 4567).

CPCC student’s signature ___Jallah Koiyan_____________________________________      

Date ___10/9/2018______________

Consent to Observe a Child – EDU 284: Capstone Practicum

Dear Parent/Guardian and/or Teacher/Administrator:

My name is _____Jallah Koiyan____________________________.  I am a student at Central Piedmont Community College.

I am currently enrolled in the course, EDU 284 – Capstone Practicum.  As part of the requirements for this course, I am conducting a study of young children.  The purpose of the assignment is to gain experience conducting systematic observations of a young child through various tools.  I would like to request permission to study your child/student.  The study makes use of one or more brief behavioral observations.  No formal standardized tests or assessments (e.g., school achievement tests, personality or intelligence tests) will be administered.

I may take photographs of your child/student during the art activity; these photos will be shared only with my instructor.  Your child’s/student’s participation is entirely voluntary and he/she may withdraw from participation at any time.

Confidentiality will be protected.  Your child/student will be identified by his/her initials in documents submitted to my instructor.  If you have any questions about this assignment, please contact my instructor Susan Butler-Staub, at 704-330-4761 or Susan.ButlerStaub@cpcc.edu

Thank you.

I, __Daniel Andropond___________________________________ (parent’s/guardian’s name), give permission for my child, _____W.F.A__________________ (child’s initials), date of birth (DOB)     7/17/2013                    to participate in the

EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Parent’s/guardian’s signature __Daniel Andropond__________________________________            

Date __10/9/2018______________

I, _______Chatmon Kimberly_______________________________________ (teacher’s/director’s/principal’s name), give permission for my student, _____________W.F.A_____________ (child’s initials), to participate in the EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have reaCd the above letter and understand its contents.

Teacher’s/director’s/principal’s signature _Chatmon Kimberly___

Date ____10/9/2018_____________

I, ___Jallah Koiyan______________________________ (CPCC student’s name), have obtained verbal consent from the above-named child.  The observation will take place at _____3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205__________________________________ (complete address of observation site – e.g., DAP Child Development Center, 123 Main Street, Charlotte, NC 12345).  The telephone number of the school/center is __980-343-6440________________ (complete telephone number of participating center/school – e.g., 704 123 4567).

CPCC student’s signature ______Jallah Koiyan__________________________________      

Date ___10/9/2018______________

Consent to Observe a Child – EDU 284: Capstone Practicum

Dear Parent/Guardian and/or Teacher/Administrator:

My name is ____Jallah Koiyan_____________________________.  I am a student at Central Piedmont Community College.

I am currently enrolled in the course, EDU 284 – Capstone Practicum.  As part of the requirements for this course, I am conducting a study of young children.  The purpose of the assignment is to gain experience conducting systematic observations of a young child through various tools.  I would like to request permission to study your child/student.  The study makes use of one or more brief behavioral observations.  No formal standardized tests or assessments (e.g., school achievement tests, personality or intelligence tests) will be administered.

I may take photographs of your child/student during the art activity; these photos will be shared only with my instructor.  Your child’s/student’s participation is entirely voluntary and he/she may withdraw from participation at any time.

Confidentiality will be protected.  Your child/student will be identified by his/her initials in documents submitted to my instructor.  If you have any questions about this assignment, please contact my instructor Susan Butler-Staub, at 704-330-4761 or Susan.ButlerStaub@cpcc.edu

Thank you.

I, _Natalya Onoshko___________________________________ (parent’s/guardian’s name), give permission for my child, ______A.H_________________ (child’s initials), date of birth (DOB)                          to participate in the

EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Parent’s/guardian’s signature ____Natal__Onoshko_______________________________     

Date __10/9/2018______________

I, ___Chatmon Kimberly___________________________________________ (teacher’s/director’s/principal’s name), give permission for my student, ____________A.H______________ (child’s initials), to participate in the EDU 284 Practicum 2 project.  I have read the above letter and understand its contents.

Teacher’s/director’s/principal’s signature ____Chatmon Kimberly_____________     

Date ___10/9/2018______________

I, _____Jallah Koiyan____________________________ (CPCC student’s name), have obtained verbal consent from the above-named child.  The observation will take place at _______3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205________________________________ (complete address of observation site – e.g., DAP Child Development Center, 123 Main Street, Charlotte, NC 12345).  The telephone number of the school/center is __980-343-6440________________ (complete telephone number of participating center/school – e.g., 704 123 4567).

CPCC student’s signature ___Jallah Koiyan_____________________________________      

Date ____10/9/2081_____________

Family/Child Interview

EDU 284

Ask a family member these questions:

Child’s Initials: H.G
Date of Birth: 2/22/2013
Age in Years and Months: 5 Years and 6 months
Date of Interview: 10/8/2013
Site of Interview: Home/Telephone 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 20295/443-480-1837
Initials of family member interviewed: M.G
Relationship to child: Mother Mother
Briefly describe the child and family: The child is white in a single family home with Father and Mother.
What new developmental skill has the child accomplished recently? (for example, crawling, walking, skipping, writing his/her name…) The child knows letter sound and sight words.
What do you see as the child’s strengths? The child is curious and likes learning.
Are there any areas of concern you have for the child? The Mother does not have concern for the child; however, she talked about attention span of her child.
What do you see as the child’s favorite activity (what does s/he like to do)? The child loves sport, gaming, and reading books.
Does the child show a hand preference?   Yes, right
Do you think it is important to read with the child?  If so, how many books per week do you estimate you read, on average?  Does the child have a favorite book, and if so, what is it? The Mother said that it is important to read to her child. She did not mention specific book the child likes to read.

SUMMARY

During the interview with H.G’s Mother, Molly, she said that her son is seriously interested in learning especially in the area of sight words; therefore, her son has learned considerably in the area of sight words. She is concerned about the attention span of her son; nevertheless, she knows and understands that it will change as he becomes mature. The child is being scaffolded in the area of sight words and reading.

The following should be asked of the child:

Background Information Responses
Child’s Name (in initials) H.G
Child’s Age (in years and months) Child’s Date of birth (DOB) 5 years and 6 months 2/22/2013
Child’s Gender: Boy(B) /Girl (G) Boy (B)
Interview Date and Time 9/20/2018 and 5 PM
Interview Place  3301 Country Club Dr, Charlotte, NC 28205
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission
(Remember to attach forms with report)
Yes, The form has been submitted with hard copy to the professor.
Questions to Ask Child’s Responses
Where does the sun go at night? The sun goes down from the moon.
Why do birds sing? They make them happy.
How did you learn to talk? From my Mom.
Why is the grass green? God made them that color.
Why do the stars shine? To light up the city.
Developmental Information Analysis
(Choose two concepts and explain the concepts in relation to responses given by the child) perception-based thinking, unidimensional thinking, centration, irreversibility, transductive reasoning, egocentrism, symbolic thought,conservation, categorization, seriation, class inclusion, animism, and artificialism
Concept 1: Based on the child’s responses to the above questions, I do not see any of these concepts being expressed by the child based on cognitive ability looking at the structure of the answer to the question.
Concept 2: Based on the child’s responses to the above questions, I do not see any of these concepts being expressed by the child based on cognitive ability looking at the structure of the answer to the question.




What cognitive stage of development according to Piaget is the child in?  Why?  (Provide details.)

Based on the child’s age mentioned above, 5 years and 6 months, the child is in the preoperational stage of development. The stage is the toddlerhood ranging from 18 months to 24 months and through early childhood at age 7.

Family/Child Interview

EDU 284

Ask a family member these questions:

Child’s Initials: S.B
Date of Birth: 12/29/2013
Age in Years and Months: 5 years and 3 months
Date of Interview: 10/8/2018
Site of Interview: Shamrock Garden Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205/704-604-5699
Initials of family member interviewed: E.S
Relationship to child: Grand Mother
Briefly describe the child and family: Sofia is the only child living with Father and Mother as lot of affection is being shown toward the child.
What new developmental skill has the child accomplished recently? (for example, crawling, walking, skipping, writing his/her name…) The child plays soccer.
What do you see as the child’s strengths? The child is very creative.
Are there any areas of concern you have for the child? She needs to improve in her reading.
What do you see as the child’s favorite activity (what does s/he like to do)? The child plays and creates things that are inspiring.
Does the child show a hand preference?  Right
Do you think it is important to read with the child?  If so, how many books per week do you estimate you read, on average?  Does the child have a favorite book, and if so, what is it? Yes, usually one book a day.

SUMMARY

During the interview with S.B’s grandmother, she said that her grandchild is very creative and she usually creates things that are inspiring; however, the area of concern concerning her grand child is the area of reading. This is the area the child is being scaffolded.

The following should be asked of the child

Background Information Responses
Child’s Name (in initials) S.B
Child’s Age (in years and months) Child’s Date of birth (DOB) 5 years and 3 months 12/29/2013
Child’s Gender: Boy(B) /Girl (G) Girl (G)
Interview Date and Time 9/20/2018 and 5:15 PM
Interview Place Shamrock Garden Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission
(Remember to attach forms with report)
Yes, the form hard copy was given to the professor.
Questions to Ask Child’s Responses
Where does the sun go at night? Down
Why do birds sing? That how God made them.
How did you learn to talk? I learned to talk by myself.
Why is the grass green? That how Mother nature made them.
Why do the stars shine? That how God made them.
Developmental Information Analysis
(Choose two concepts and explain the concepts in relation to responses given by the child) perception-based thinking, unidimensional thinking, centration, irreversibility, transductive reasoning, egocentrism, symbolic thought,conservation, categorization, seriation, class inclusion, animism, and artificialism
Concept 1: With respect to how the child has responded to the questions, I do not observe any concept expressed with regard to these terminologies listed below.
Concept 2: With respect to how the child has responded to the questions, I do not observe any concept expressed in the answer with related to these terminologies listed.

What cognitive stage of development according to Piaget is the child in?  Why?  (Provide details.)

Based on the child’s age mentioned above, 5 years and 3 months, the child is in the preoperational stage of development. The stage is the toddlerhood ranging from 18 months to 24 months and through early childhood at age 7.

                                                                Family/Child Interview

EDU 284

Ask a family member these questions:

Child’s Initials: H.K
Date of Birth: 5/12/2013
Age in Years and Months: 5 years and 3 months
Date of Interview: 10/8/2018
Site of Interview: Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205/704-369-6930
Initials of family member interviewed: JLK
Relationship to child: Mother
Briefly describe the child and family: Henry is a loving boy interested in learning. Henry has a Mother, Father, and sister.
What new developmental skill has the child accomplished recently? (for example, crawling, walking, skipping, writing his/her name…) Henry has been learning soccer. He has also been writing his letters and coloring as well.
What do you see as the child’s strengths? He loves sport and music and he is very good at learning his letter.
Are there any areas of concern you have for the child? No, he is learning in school and behaving well.
What do you see as the child’s favorite activity (what does s/he like to do)? He loves playing soccer.
Does the child show a hand preference?  Yes, right
Do you think it is important to read with the child?  If so, how many books per week do you estimate you read, on average?  Does the child have a favorite book, and if so, what is it? Yes, we feel reading is important. We read four books a night.
   

SUMMARY

During the interview with H.K’s mother, Jaime, she said that her son is very serious when it comes to learning. He is good at coloring pictures, writing sight words, playing soccer, and reading books during the week. The child is being scaffolded in the area of reading.

The following should be asked of the child:

Background Information Responses
Child’s Name (in initials) H.K
Child’s Age (in years and months) Child’s Date of birth (DOB) 5 years and 3 months 5/12/2013
Child’s Gender: Boy(B) /Girl (G) Boy (B)
Interview Date and Time 9/20/2018 and 4:45 PM
Interview Place Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission
(Remember to attach forms with report)
Yes, form hard copy was given to the professor.
Questions to Ask Child’s Responses
Where does the sun go at night? In the sky
Why do birds sing? That how God made them.
How did you learn to talk? My mama teach me.
Why is the grass green? That how God made them.
Why do the stars shine? Is because that how God made them.
Developmental Information Analysis
(Choose two concepts and explain the concepts in relation to responses given by the child) perception-based thinking, unidimensional thinking, centration, irreversibility, transductive reasoning, egocentrism, symbolic thought,conservation, categorization, seriation, class inclusion, animism, and artificialism
Concept 1: Based on the responses to the questions, I do not see or observe any of these concepts being expressed in the child’s cognitive expression.
Concept 2: Based on the responses given to the questions, I do not see or observe any of these concepts of thoughts being expressed in child’s cognitive expression in answering the questions.

What cognitive stage of development according to Piaget is the child in?  Why?  (Provide details.)

Based on the child’s age mentioned above, 5 years and 6 months, the child is in the preoperational stage of development. The stage is the toddlerhood ranging from 18 months to 24 months and through early childhood at age 7.

Family/Child Interview

EDU 284

Ask a family member these questions:

Child’s Initials: W.F.A
Date of Birth: 7/17/2013
Age in Years and Months: 5 years and 3 months
Date of Interview: 10/8/2018
Site of Interview: Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205/980-355-9755
Initials of family member interviewed: VC
Relationship to child: Mother
Briefly describe the child and family: He is the first born with two little sisters, Mother, and Father.
What new developmental skill has the child accomplished recently? (for example, crawling, walking, skipping, writing his/her name…) He has achieved some new sight words and reading improvements.
What do you see as the child’s strengths? Strong willed, vocabulary-extensive
Are there any areas of concern you have for the child? He gets frustrated easily if he does not master something.
What do you see as the child’s favorite activity (what does s/he like to do)? Soccer, race cars, and movies
Does the child show a hand preference?  Right
Do you think it is important to read with the child?  If so, how many books per week do you estimate you read, on average?  Does the child have a favorite book, and if so, what is it? Yes, he reads 15 books a week.
   

During the interview with W.F.A’s mother, she said that her son has achieved considerably in the area of sight words which has impacted his vocabulary enrichment extensively. His son loves reading; nevertheless, she expressed that her son will need improvement in the area of reading. The child is being scaffolded in the area of reading.

The following should be asked of the child:

Background Information Responses
Child’s Name (in initials) W.F.A
Child’s Age (in years and months) Child’s Date of birth (DOB) 5 years and 3 months 7/17/2013
Child’s Gender: Boy(B) /Girl (G) Boy (B)
Interview Date and Time 9/20/2018 and 4:15 PM
Interview Place Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission
(Remember to attach forms with report)
Yes, the form hard copy was delivered to the professor.
Questions to Ask Child’s Responses
Where does the sun go at night? In the sky.
Why do birds sing? That how God made them.
How did you learn to talk? My Mom teach me.
Why is the grass green? That how God made them.
Why do the stars shine? That how God made them.
Developmental Information Analysis
(Choose two concepts and explain the concepts in relation to responses given by the child) perception-based thinking, unidimensional thinking, centration, irreversibility, transductive reasoning, egocentrism, symbolic thought,conservation, categorization, seriation, class inclusion, animism, and artificialism
Concept 1: Based on the responses the child has given to the questions, there is no indication that such concept with respect to these terminologies exists.
Concept 2: Based on the responses the child has given to the questions, there is no indication that such concept with respect to these terminologies exists.

What cognitive stage of development according to Piaget is the child in?  Why?  (Provide details.)

Based on the child’s age mentioned above, 5 years and 6 months, the child is in the preoperational stage of development. The stage is the toddlerhood ranging from 18 months to 24 months and through early childhood at age 7.

Family/Child Interview

EDU 284

Ask a family member these questions:

Child’s Initials: A.H
Date of Birth: 5/9/2013
Age in Years and Months: 5 years and 5 months
Date of Interview: 10/8/2018
Site of Interview: Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205
Initials of family member interviewed: N.O
Relationship to child: Mother
Briefly describe the child and family: The child is the third in the family, one brother, one sister, Mother, and Father.
What new developmental skill has the child accomplished recently? (for example, crawling, walking, skipping, writing his/her name…) He is able to recognize sight words, and knows the sounds of letters.
What do you see as the child’s strengths? Reading
Are there any areas of concern you have for the child? Not actually; however, I am concerned about his attention span.
What do you see as the child’s favorite activity (what does s/he like to do)? He likes reading books.
Does the child show a hand preference?  Right
Do you think it is important to read with the child?  If so, how many books per week do you estimate you read, on average?  Does the child have a favorite book, and if so, what is it? Yes, it is important to read to my child. He reads two to three books a day.
   

SUMMARY

During the interview with A.H’s mother, she said that her son loves reading as the result of being able to recognize sight words and letters; however, she is concerned concerning the attention span of her child. The child is being scaffolded in the area of reading.

The following should be asked of the child:

Background Information Responses
Child’s Name (in initials) A.H
Child’s Age (in years and months) Child’s Date of birth (DOB) 5 years and 5 months 5/9/2013
Child’s Gender: Boy(B) /Girl (G) Boy (B)
Interview Date and Time 9/20/2018 and 5:45 PM
Interview Place Shamrock Gardens Elementary 3301 Country Club Drive, Charlotte, NC 28205
Parent(s)/Guardian Permission
(Remember to attach forms with report)
Yes, the hard copy was delivered to the professor.
Questions to Ask Child’s Responses
Where does the sun go at night? When I go to sleep.
Why do birds sing? They sing because that how they air out.
How did you learn to talk? My Oldma teach me how to talk.
Why is the grass green? That the color of the grass.
Why do the stars shine? That how they are like.
Developmental Information Analysis
(Choose two concepts and explain the concepts in relation to responses given by the child) perception-based thinking, unidimensional thinking, centration, irreversibility, transductive reasoning, egocentrism, symbolic thought,conservation, categorization, seriation, class inclusion, animism, and artificialism
Concept 1: Based on the responses the child has given to the questions, there is no indication that any of these terminologies exists as concept in the child’s response.
Concept 2: Based on the responses the child has given to the questions, there is no indication that any of these terminologies exists as concept in the child’s response.

What cognitive stage of development according to Piaget is the child in?  Why?  (Provide details.)

Based on the child’s age mentioned above, 5 years and 5 months, the child is in the preoperational stage of development. The stage is the toddlerhood ranging from 18 months to 24 months and through early childhood at age 7.

Individual Child Chart 1

Child Initials and Date of Birth: H.G 2/22/2013

Areas to Address Comments and Explanations
Family Members (e.g., who is included in child’s family) The child is white male in a single family home with Father (name not mentioned) and Mother (Molly).
Culture (e.g., customs, values, beliefs, patterns of behavior – NAEYC, 2009) The child is curious and likes learning. The child loves sport, gaming, and reading books. The child knows letter sound and sight words. The child loves sport, gaming, and reading books.
Life Experiences and/or stressors (i.e., anything that has occurred in child’s life – moving, divorce, new sibling, travel, health issues) Nothing significant has occurred in child’s life or family with respect to the items mentioned.
Interests (i.e., what does the child enjoy doing, what does the family enjoy doing together) H.G loves: Sports Gaming Reading Sight words  
Dispositions to Learning & Response to Challenges (i.e., how does child respond to learning things, how does child react to activities that are difficult – for examples refer to Foundations Approaches to Learning) H.G shows no indicative of disposition to learning and responses to challenges based on the family interview conducted. The mother did not mention anything relative to these.  
Developmental Strengths (i.e. what child does well with regards to domains) Domain: Health & Physical Development ·         H.G usually uses scissors to cut papers or pictures drawing art project; therefore, he has fine motor skill development. I saw H.G balanced on one foot for more than 10 seconds; therefore, he has good gross motor skill development.   Domain: Social Development During play at school, H.G played alongside with his friends.He and his friends were frequently involved in group imaginative play when they talked things that they did not possess.   Domain: Language & Communication H.G speaks very clearly and slowly to be understood by his audience. H.G spoke in sentences that contain more than 5 words.   Domain: Cognitive H.G recognizes and differentiates between things with reference to size and shape. When H.G was given blocks of two different sizes to arrange them according to their looks, he arranged them from the shortest to the longest. H.G was able to put puzzle of animals according to how the animal looks by putting appropriate pieces to their correct orders and placement. H.G identifies number from 1 to 10.  
Emerging Developmental Areas (i.e., areas that need support; refer to the Developmental checklist and look for ‘No’) Domain: Health and Physical development H.G does not walk backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel).   Domain: Language and Communication During the child’s interview H.G was not able to use correct verb in answering the questions.   Domain: Cognitive H.G can create a rectangle shape when given two triangles. H.G cannot count to 100.   Domain: Approaches to Learning H.G does not ask frequent questions.  
Physical Needs & Health Areas (i.e., does child need anything to complete tasks or has any health concerns) The Mother does not have concern for the child; however, she talked about attention span of her child.
3 Goals from NCFELD (e.g., refer to emerging areas to develop these)   Domain: Cognitive Goal CD-10: Children show understanding of numbers and quantities during play and other activities.   Goal CD-12: Children identify and use common shapes and concepts about position during play and other activities.   Goal CD-13: Children use mathematical thinking to solve problems in their everyday environment.   Domain: Health and Physical development Goal HPD-4: Children develop the large muscle control and abilities needed to move through and explore their environment.   Goal HPD-5: Children develop small muscle control and hand-eye coordination to manipulate objects and work with tools   Goal HPD-2: Children engage in active physical play indoors and outdoors.   Domain: Language and Communication   Goal LDC-6: Children use most grammatical constructions of their home language well.   Goal LDC-2: Children participate in conversations with peers and adults in one-on-one, small, and larger group interactions.   Goal LDC-4: Children speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.   Domain: Approaches to Learning   Goal LDC-3: Children ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.   Goal APL-1: Children show curiosity and express interest in the world around them.   Goal APL-2: Children actively seek to understand the world around them.  

Individual Child Chart 2

Child Initials and Date of Birth: S.B 12/29/2013

Areas to Address Comments and Explanations
Family Members (e.g., who is included in child’s family) S.B is the only child living with Father (name not mentioned) and Mother (Erin) as lot of affection is being shown toward the child.
Culture (e.g., customs, values, beliefs, patterns of behavior – NAEYC, 2009) The area of cultural beliefs or pattern of child or family life has not been explored; therefore, there is nothing that can be mentioned in this section block.
Life Experiences and/or stressors (i.e., anything that has occurred in child’s life – moving, divorce, new sibling, travel, health issues) The grandmother did not mention anything that has occurred in the child or family’s members lives with relative to any of these subjects mentioned.
Interests (i.e., what does the child enjoy doing, what does the family enjoy doing together) S.B loves: Plays soccer. Draws Loves creativities  
Dispositions to Learning & Response to Challenges (i.e., how does child respond to learning things, how does child react to activities that are difficult – for examples refer to Foundations Approaches to Learning) S.B is conserved and not expressive as compared to the other students in the class; therefore, S.B may not be eager and interested in learning and trying new things.
Developmental Strengths (i.e. what child does well with regards to domains) Domain: Health and Physical development S.B Demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam. S.B Jumps forward 10 times. S.B exhibits control when using a pen or pencil. Domain: Language and Communication S.B speaks very clear and her speech is understandable or intelligible to English speaking people. When S.B was asked to name items at home that are important to her, she named bowls, spoons, towels, beds, computers etc. and gave their functions. Domain: Cognitive S.B built steps using blocks during dramatic play. S.B arranged number according to their ascending and descending orders as she was instructed. Domain: Approaches to Learning When I asked S.B to take piece of papers to draw anything she loves at home, she followed direction.  
Emerging Developmental Areas (i.e., areas that need support; refer to the Developmental checklist and look for ‘No’) Domain: Health and Physical development S.B will not walk backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel. S.B cannot complete a forward roll (somersault). Domain: Language and Communication S.B does not have large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words. When looking at a familiar book S.B will not tell the story. Domain: Social and Emotional S.B does not participate in group imaginative play. S.B does not demonstrate pride in accomplishments by boasting. Domain: Cognitive S.B does not copy many letters and shapes when drawing. Domain: Approaches to Learning S.B does not ask frequent questions.  
Physical Needs & Health Areas (i.e., does child need anything to complete tasks or has any health concerns) Grandmother said during the interview that S.B needs to improve in her reading. The child is being scaffolded in this area.
3 Goals from NCFELD (e.g., refer to emerging areas to develop these)   Domain: Health and Physical development   Goal HPD-4: Children develop the large muscle control and abilities needed to move through and explore their environment.   Goal HPD-5: Children develop small muscle control and hand-eye coordination to manipulate objects and work with tools.   Goal HPD-2: Children engage in active physical play indoors and outdoors.       Domain: Language and Communication Goal LDC-7: Children respond to and use a growing vocabulary. Goal LDC-1: Children understand communications from others. Goal LDC-8: Children develop interest in books and motivation to read.   Domain: Social and Emotional Goal ESD-3: Children form relationships and interact positively with familiar adults who are consistent and responsive to their needs. Goal ESD-4: Children form relationships and interact positively with other children. Goal ESD-5: Children demonstrate the social and behavioral skills needed to successfully participate in groups.   Domain: Cognitive Goal CD-1: Children use their senses to construct knowledge about the world around them. Goal CD-2: Children recall information and use it for new situations and problems. Goal CD-3: Children demonstrate the ability to think about their own thinking: reasoning, taking perspectives, and making decisions.   Domain: Approaches to Learning Goal LDC-3: Children ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood. Goal LDC-4: Children speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.

Individual Child Chart 3

Child Initials and Date of Birth: H.K 5/12/2013

Areas to Address Comments and Explanations
Family Members (e.g., who is included in child’s family) Henry is a loving boy interested in learning. Henry has a Mother(name not mentioned), Father(name not mentioned), and sister.
Culture (e.g., customs, values, beliefs, patterns of behavior – NAEYC, 2009) The cultural aspect of the family was not explored; therefore, I do not have information on this.
Life Experiences and/or stressors (i.e., anything that has occurred in child’s life – moving, divorce, new sibling, travel, health issues) This aspect of the family was to explored; therefore, there is no information on this.
Interests (i.e., what does the child enjoy doing, what does the family enjoy doing together) H.K loves: Playing soccer Reading books Sight words Drawings Coloring picture books  
Dispositions to Learning & Response to Challenges (i.e., how does child respond to learning things, how does child react to activities that are difficult – for examples refer to Foundations Approaches to Learning) H.K is learning well in school and behaving well without reservation according to the Mother.
Developmental Strengths (i.e. what child does well with regards to domains) Domain: Health and Physical development H.K demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam. H.K exhibits control when using a pen or pencil. Domain: Language and Communication When H.K was asked to draw thing from home, he drew bed, pot, spoons etc H.K knows the names of his mother and father. Domain: Cognitive H.K lay blocks on each other during play at block center. H.K understands the terms, dark, light, and early.       Domain: Social and Emotional H.K played cooperatively with his friends during dramatic play. H.K is able to share and take turns with peers. Domain: Approaches to Learning H.K asks frequent questions.  
Emerging Developmental Areas (i.e., areas that need support; refer to the Developmental checklist and look for ‘No’)         Domain: Health and Physical development H.K does not walk up and down stairs putting one foot on each step without holding a railing or adult hand. H.K does not walk backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel).   Domain: Language and Communication When looking at a familiar book H.K will not tell the story. H.K does not have a large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words. Domain: Cognitive H.K does not understand the concept of same when talking about size and shape. Domain: Social and Emotional H.K does not demonstrate pride in accomplishments by boasting. Domain: Approaches to Learning When given directions or tasks by parents or adult caregiver(s), H.K does not follow through (most of the time).  
Physical Needs & Health Areas (i.e., does child need anything to complete tasks or has any health concerns) H.K is well health wise and does not need anything to complete tasks according to the Mother.
3 Goals from NCFELD (e.g., refer to emerging areas to develop these)   Domain: Health and Physical development Goal HPD-4: Children develop the large muscle control and abilities needed to move through and explore their environment.  Goal HPD-5: Children develop small muscle control and hand-eye coordination to manipulate objects and work with tools. Goal HPD-2: Children engage in active physical play indoors and outdoors.     Domain: Language and Communication Goal LDC-8: Children develop interest in books and motivation to read. Goal LDC-7: Children respond to and use a growing vocabulary. Domain: Cognitive Goal CD-12: Children identify and use common shapes and concepts about position during play and other activities. Goal CD-13: Children use mathematical thinking to solve problems in their everyday environment.   Domain: Social and Emotional Goal ESD-1: Children demonstrate a positive sense of self-identity and self-awareness. Goal ESD-2: Children express positive feelings about themselves and confidence in what they can do.   Domain: Approaches to Learning Goal LDC-3: Children ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood. Goal LDC-1: Children understand communications from others. .

.

Individual Child Chart 4

Child Initials and Date of Birth: W.F.A 7/17/2013

Areas to Address Comments and Explanations
Family Members (e.g., who is included in child’s family) He is the first born with two little sisters (names not mentioned), Mother (Andrepond), and Father (Daniel).
Culture (e.g., customs, values, beliefs, patterns of behavior – NAEYC, 2009) During family’s interview, cultural of aspect of family was not explored to find out family’s values, beliefs or pattern of life.
Life Experiences and/or stressors (i.e., anything that has occurred in child’s life – moving, divorce, new sibling, travel, health issues) During family’s interview, family did not mention or disclose life experiences or stressors that negatively influenced any family members.
Interests (i.e., what does the child enjoy doing, what does the family enjoy doing together) W.F.A plays/loves: Soccer Movies Race cars
Dispositions to Learning & Response to Challenges (i.e., how does child respond to learning things, how does child react to activities that are difficult – for examples refer to Foundations Approaches to Learning)   He gets frustrated easily if he does not master something.
Developmental Strengths (i.e. what child does well with regards to domains) Domain: Health and Physical development W.F.A can balance on one foot for 10 seconds. W.F.A can jump forward 10 times.   Domain: Language and Communication W.F.A’s Speech is entirely intelligible to unfamiliar people, meaning anyone can understand almost everything the child says. W.F.Adefines the function of various familiar objects (a spoon is for eating). Domain: Cognitive W.F.A demonstrates understanding of sequencing by putting objects in the correct positions (first, second, last). W.F.Aidentifies the numbers 1 through 10.       Domain: Social and Emotional W.F.Aengages in cooperative play with peers. W.F.Adisplays affection toward younger children and animals. Domain: Approaches to Learning W.F.Aasks frequent questions.    
Emerging Developmental Areas (i.e., areas that need support; refer to the Developmental checklist and look for ‘No’) Domain: Health and Physical development W.F.A cannot walk backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel). W.F.A cannot touch his/her toes without bending his knees. Domain: Language and Communication W.F.A will not tell a story when looking at a familiar book. W.F.A does not use past tense correctly for irregular and regular verbs. Domain: Cognitive W.F.A cannot count to 100. W.F.A does not understand the terms, dark, light, and early.    
Physical Needs & Health Areas (i.e., does child need anything to complete tasks or has any health concerns) The child does not have any health concern nor needs anything to complete tasks.
3 Goals from NCFELD (e.g., refer to emerging areas to develop these)   Domain: Health and Physical development Goal HPD-2: Children engage in active physical play indoors and outdoors. Goal HPD-4: Children develop the large muscle control and abilities needed to move through and explore their environment. Goal HPD-5: Children develop small muscle control and hand-eye coordination to manipulate objects and work with tools.   Domain: Language and Communication Goal LDC-6: Children use most grammatical constructions of their home language well. Goal LDC-8: Children develop interest in books and motivation to read. Goal LDC-4: Children speak audibly and express thoughts, feelings, and ideas clearly.     Domain: Cognitive Goal CD-10: Children show understanding of numbers and quantities during play and other activities. Goal CD-2: Children recall information and use it for new situations and problems.

Individual Child Chart 5

Child Initials and Date of Birth: A.H 5/9/2013

Areas to Address Comments and Explanations
Family Members (e.g., who is included in child’s family) The child is the third in the family, one brother, one sister, Mother, and Father.
Culture (e.g., customs, values, beliefs, patterns of behavior – NAEYC, 2009) During family’s interview, cultural of aspect of family was not explored to find out family’s values, beliefs or pattern of life.
Life Experiences and/or stressors (i.e., anything that has occurred in child’s life – moving, divorce, new sibling, travel, health issues) During family’s interview, family did not mention or disclose life experiences or stressors that negatively influenced any family members.
Interests (i.e., what does the child enjoy doing, what does the family enjoy doing together) A.H is interest in or has skill in: Recognition of sight words Phonological pattern of alphabetical letters Reading story books    
Dispositions to Learning & Response to Challenges (i.e., how does child respond to learning things, how does child react to activities that are difficult – for examples refer to Foundations Approaches to Learning) During family‘s interview, Mother did not mention anything relative to the child with reference to disposition to learning and response to challenges in the child’s life.
Developmental Strengths (i.e. what child does well with regards to domains) Domain: Health and Physical development A.H demonstrates balance by walking on a balance beam. A.H can balance on one foot for 10 seconds. Domain: Language and Communication A.H’s speech is entirely intelligible to unfamiliar people, meaning anyone can understand almost everything the child says. A.H defines the function of various familiar objects (a spoon is for eating. Domain: Cognitive When presented with objects of various lengths A.H can arrange the pieces in order from shortest to tallest or smallest to biggest. A.H demonstrates understanding of sequencing by putting objects in the correct positions (first, second, last).   Domain: Social and Emotional When given directions or tasks by parents or adult caregiver(s), A.H follows through (most of the time). A.Hdisplays affection toward younger children and animals.   Domain: Approaches to Learning A.Happears eager and interested in learning and trying new things.  
Emerging Developmental Areas (i.e., areas that need support; refer to the Developmental checklist and look for ‘No’) Domain: Health and Physical development A.H does not walk up and down stairs putting one foot on each step without holding a railing or adult hand. A.H does not walk backward putting one foot behind the other (toe to heel). Domain: Language and Communication A.H does not have a large vocabulary that includes approximately 1500 words. When looking at a familiar book A.H will not tell the story. Domain: Cognitive A.H does not understand the concept of same when talking about size and shape. When presented with two bowls that are the exact same size and shape, A.H cannot tell you which bowl has more or less water to demonstrate the concepts of more/less. Domain: Approaches to Learning A.H does notask frequent questions.  
Physical Needs & Health Areas (i.e., does child need anything to complete tasks or has any health concerns) Mother is concerned about A.H’s attention span; nevertheless, he does not need anything or assistance to complete tasks.  
3 Goals from NCFELD (e.g., refer to emerging areas to develop these).   Domain: Health and Physical development Goal HPD-2: Children engage in active physical play indoors and outdoors. Goal HPD-4: Children develop the large muscle control and abilities needed to move through and explore their environment. Goal HPD-5: Children develop small muscle control and hand-eye coordination to manipulate objects and work with tools.         Domain: Language and Communication Goal LDC-8: Children develop interest in books and motivation to read. Goal LDC-7: Children respond to and use a growing vocabulary. Goal LDC-6: Children use most grammatical constructions of their home language well.   Domain: Cognitive Goal CD-10: Children show understanding of numbers and quantities during play and other activities. Goal CD-12: Children identify and use common shapes and concepts about position during play and other activities. Goal CD-13: Children use mathematical thinking to solve problems in their everyday environment.   Domain: Approaches to Learning Goal LDC-3: Children ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.  
Activity Plans for child1, child 2, child 3, child 4, and child 5
 
Activity (e.g., name):   Complete Metamorphosis
  Subject   NCFELD Goal:     Science   Goal CD-14: Children observe and describe characteristics of living things and the physical world.  
Resource (i.e., where did you locate this activity): The Amateur Entomologists’ Society, P.O Box 8774, London, SW7 5ZG/http://www.amateursoc.org
Age Group: 5 years
Objective (i.e., what do you want the child to accomplish through this activity?  For example: the child will mix colors of paint, the child will sing a new song, and the child will follow the leader): The child will be able to: Define metamorphosis Know how insects change Know the stages of metamorphosis Know the organism that undergoes metamorphosis Name common animals in his or  her environment that undergo metamorphosis
Materials (i.e., list every single item needed to carry out the activity with children. For example: paint, paper, leaves, smocks): The materials used for this activity include the following: Papers, pencils, flannel board, and printed handouts for students.    
Activity Description (provide a concise description of the activity addressing the sequence of teacher and child behaviors with specific focus on how to support child’s active engagement. Provide enough detail such that another adult in classroom could implement): This activity is designed to introduce to students how insects develop to become full adults. The teacher will read the story on complete metamorphosis and explain the terminologies followed by the explanation of the stages of complete metamorphosis. The teacher will display various drawings on the flannel board indicating the stages of how insects change. After the display and the explanation of the lesson, students will be asked questions on the subject to assess their levels of understanding on the topic. Students will be affirmed and encouraged by applauding them who contribute to the discussion. The teacher will become the facilitator of the discussion allowing the students to take the lead.  
Procedures (i.e., list all steps that are necessary to carry out this activity – anyone reading this section should be able to copy and carry out plan): The teacher will gather all materials such as the handouts, flannel board, flannel board pieces, pencils, papers, pens and others. The teacher will call the class to order and introduce the topic explaining in detail what metamorphosis is and things affected by this natural phenomenon. He will read the story on insects’ metamorphosis while asking questions dialogically and allowing student’s responses to the story reading.
Variations (i.e., how can the activity be changed to create new interest for the children?  For example: perhaps the activity will be done outside rather than inside. Perhaps a scent will be added to the play dough mixture. How can you tweak it a little?): This activity will be changed to create interests in children by singing the various stages of complete metamorphosis into songs. Children will be involved in singing the songs along with the teacher.
Divergent Questions: (i.e., a divergent question is open-ended and does not have a right or wrong answer. For example: What would happen if? What does this remind you of?): The various questions will be asked after the completion of the lesson to test the level of students in the classroom: What do you know about insects’ changes? Tell the class something concerning metamorphosis. While insects change? What did you learn from the flannel board story today? What did you learn from singing the flannel board story?
Focused Differentiation for Individual Children (Identify the child or children who need support to actively engage in the activity. Identify the type of differentiation strategy to be used [i.e. environmental support, material adaptations, activity simplification, child preference, special equipment, adult support, peer support, invisible support] Briefly describe how it will be used for the specific child/children): This classroom or lesson taught is assumed to be an inclusive classroom accommodating children of both normalcy and children with exceptionalities. In this regard, children with cognitive delay, the teacher will repeat words several times and makes sure that children with this cognitive deficiency grasp the concept of the materials taught before going further. Children with speech problem will be asked to clap their hands while the flannel board story is being sung.
Activity (e.g., name): Word Problem
  Subject   NCFELD Goal:     Math   Goal CD-10: Children show understanding of numbers and quantities during play and other activities.    
Resource (i.e., where did you locate this activity): Self generated/Student
Age Group: 5 years
Objective (i.e., what do you want the child to accomplish through this activity?  For example: the child will mix colors of paint, the child will sing a new song, and the child will follow the leader): The child will be able to: Add numbers S subtract number Multiply numbers Explore word problems
Materials (i.e., list every single item needed to carry out the activity with children. For example: paint, paper, leaves, smocks): Pencils, papers, note books, text book, and loose papers.    
Activity Description (provide a concise description of the activity addressing the sequence of teacher and child behaviors with specific focus on how to support child’s active engagement. Provide enough detail such that another adult in classroom could implement): This activity is designed to assess the students’ level of understanding concerning word problems; however, there will be mechanical problems introduced in various principles of Mathematics such as addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division. These basic principles of Mathematics will be explored before a word problem will be introduced to them.    
Procedures (i.e., list all steps that are necessary to carry out this activity – anyone reading this section should be able to copy and carry out plan): Teacher will gather all materials necessary, call the class to order, and distribute pencils and note books to students. Teacher will introduce the basic principles of Mathematics and explain each. Teacher will give sample problem for each and he and the student work the problem together. When the students have understood the concept of these basic principles of Mathematics, the teacher will test the level of students’ comprehension by giving them sample mechanical problem in addition, subtraction, division, and multiplication to solve.
Variations (i.e., how can the activity be changed to create new interest for the children?  For example: perhaps the activity will be done outside rather than inside. Perhaps a scent will be added to the play dough mixture. How can you tweak it a little?): Students can be divided into teams competitively to solve problems in the basic principles of Mathematics. The winner for the match will be awarded prize. This is done to encourage students to study.
Divergent Questions: (i.e., a divergent question is open-ended and does not have a right or wrong answer. For example: What would happen if? What does this remind you of?): The following questions will be asked: Tell the class what you learned about addition? Tell the class what you learned about subtraction? Tell the class what you learned about multiplication? Tell the class what you learned about division problem?
Focused Differentiation for Individual Children (Identify the child or children who need support to actively engage in the activity. Identify the type of differentiation strategy to be used [i.e. environmental support, material adaptations, activity simplification, child preference, special equipment, adult support, peer support, invisible support] Briefly describe how it will be used for the specific child/children): Children who are paralyzed and whose hands cannot move should be asked to answer problems orally instead of writing the answer down on papers. Students, who have hearing problems, should be given earpiece or hearing aid to modify their hearings. Children with cognitive delay should be given one problem a week on only one basic principle instead of all principles.
                                                                                                                                        
    Activity (e.g., name):   A Biography of Martin Luther King, Jr.    
Subject:   NCFELD Goal: Social Studies   Goal LDC-5: Children describe familiar people, places, things, and events.    
  Resource (i.e., where did you locate this activity): Biography of Martin Luther, Jr http://www.ligonier.org
Age Group: 5 years old
Objective (i.e., what do you want the child to accomplish through this activity?  For example: the child will mix colors of paint, the child will sing a new song, and the child will follow the leader): The child will be able to:  Tell story noting the beginning, the middle, and the end.  Tell story in chronological order as the story occurred. Know the importance of the growing year in the life an individual Know that greatness begins when at the early stage of the individual person Aspire to become great by emulating the figure studied in this activity.
Materials (i.e., list every single item needed to carry out the activity with children. For example: paint, paper, leaves, smocks): Martin Luther King, Jr.: A Biography for Young Children written by Carol Hilgartner Schlank and Barbara Metzger  
Activity Description (provide a concise description of the activity addressing the sequence of teacher and child behaviors with specific focus on how to support child’s active engagement. Provide enough detail such that another adult in classroom could implement): The activity is designed to motivate children concerning self-actualization knowing that small beginning with hard work and determination can lead to success and prominent in life. The teacher reads the story aloud dialogically and challenges students to think determinatively and analytically concerning what they want to become in lives as to reach prominent.
Procedures (i.e., list all steps that are necessary to carry out this activity – anyone reading this section should be able to copy and carry out plan): After the reading of the biographical story, teacher will ask students in open-ended question format to express their feelings concerning what they want to become referencing Martin Luther King, Jr. as the motivation variable. Questions will also be asked from the story to students that do not relate to their feelings.  
Variations (i.e., how can the activity be changed to create new interest for the children?  For example: perhaps the activity will be done outside rather than inside. Perhaps a scent will be added to the play dough mixture. How can you tweak it a little?):   This activity can become interesting and indicating variations when children act out this story in the dramatic format to give speeches contemporary to the Civil Rights Movement leadership.
Divergent Questions: (i.e., a divergent question is open-ended and does not have a right or wrong answer. For example: What would happen if? What does this remind you of?): After the completion of the story, the following question will be asked: What did you learned from the story?How do you understand other people?What prize it takes to pay in bringing change to society?What some of the things one needs to do in order to become educated and helpful to society?How does change come easily?    
  Focused Differentiation for Individual Children (Identify the child or children who need support to actively engage in the activity. Identify the type of differentiation strategy to be used [i.e. environmental support, material adaptations, activity simplification, child preference, special equipment, adult support, peer support, invisible support] Briefly describe how it will be used for the specific child/children):   In this activity, children with hearing problem will be hearing aid to help them listen to the story. Children with cognitive delay, the teacher will take into consideration by reading the story slowly and asking simple question from the story to allow the children to process the story while being read and told. This dialogic format helps children understand what happens in the story.
Activity Plan for child 1, child 2, child 3, child 4, and child 5.
        Activity (e.g., name):         Zak’s New Home
  Subject:   NCFELD Goal:   Reading    Goal LDC-3: Children ask and answer questions in order to seek help, get information, or clarify something that is not understood.    
      Resource (i.e., where did you locate this activity):     Zak’s New Home: Early World of Learning by World Book, A learning Readiness Program    
    Age Group:     5 years old
Objective (i.e., what do you want the child to accomplish through this activity?  For example: the child will mix colors of paint, the child will sing a new song, and the child will follow the leader): The child will be able to: Read story books Understand the beginning, the middle, and the end of the story Know various characters in the story and their functions Know how the characters are related giving meanings to the story Conceive the various conceptual understandings of the story etc.
  Materials (i.e., list every single item needed to carry out the activity with children. For example: paint, paper, leaves, smocks):   Zak’s New Home: Early World of Learning by World Book, A learning Readiness Program    
Activity Description (provide a concise description of the activity addressing the sequence of teacher and child behaviors with specific focus on how to support child’s active engagement. Provide enough detail such that another adult in classroom could implement):   The goal of this activity is to make students listen attentively in order to critically and analytically respond to questions when the teacher has read aloud the literature to the students. As the teacher reads the story, he pauses and asks a follow-up question to examine if students are paying attention to the reading. If the follow-up questions are answered during the reading time, the teacher continues the reading of the story. This dialogic reading approach is observed until the teacher finishes the story.  
Procedures (i.e., list all steps that are necessary to carry out this activity – anyone reading this section should be able to copy and carry out plan): The teacher will call the class into order and introduce the story, the writer, and the importance of the story to the students’ learning. Give each copy or handout to the students. He will call for the attentiveness of the students before he begins to read story.
  Variations (i.e., how can the activity be changed to create new interest for the children?  For example: perhaps the activity will be done outside rather than inside. Perhaps a scent will be added to the play dough mixture. How can you tweak it a little?):   To make the story memorable, parts of story should be developed into songs so that the children can sing the songs during class time.
Divergent Questions: (i.e., a divergent question is open-ended and does not have a right or wrong answer. For example: What would happen if? What does this remind you of?):   After the completion of the story, the following questions should be asked: Tell the class what you understand from the story.How can you apply this story to your situation?Why will you tell this story to classmates or family members?Tell what you like or dislike about the story.  
Focused Differentiation for Individual Children (Identify the child or children who need support to actively engage in the activity. Identify the type of differentiation strategy to be used [i.e. environmental support, material adaptations, activity simplification, child preference, special equipment, adult support, peer support, invisible support] Briefly describe how it will be used for the specific child/children):   In the situation wherein a child is deaf, the support applicable to help the child remained focused during the narration of the story with relative to comprehension is putting sign language into place coupled with a video narrating the story. If someone in the midst with hearing problem, the best alternative is to implore an hearing aid device for the proper functioning of the ear to receive sound or audibility.
Activity Plan for Child 1, Child 2, Child 3, Child 4, and Child 5
      Activity: (i.e. name)   NCFELD Goals:       How to Pronounce Words and to Read Books using Syllabification Method and Word Drill.   Goal LDC-11: Children develop phonological awareness. Goal LDC-12: Children develop knowledge of the alphabet and the alphabetic principle. Goal LDC-13: Children use writing and other symbols to record information and communicate for a variety of purposes. Goal LDC-14: Children use knowledge of letters in their attempts to write. Goal LDC-15: Children use writing skills and writing conventions.  
Subject/Curriculum Area (e.g., art, science, math): Literacy/English
Resource (i.e., where did you locate this activity): Self-generated
Age Group: 5 years old
Objective (i.e., what do you want the child to accomplish through this activity?  For example: the child will mix colors of paint, the child will sing a new song, and the child will follow the leader):   The child will be able to explore the objectives under each domain as listed below to enable him or her spell words, recognize words, and to read books:   Physical/motor   Children will be asked to drill or to look for words through notebooks or clipped sheets when they have been taught the materials. Children will be asked to cut letters of the word aphetically when they have practiced how to cut the letters. Children will be asked to arrange the letters into syllables according to the word parts using their hands. Children will be asked to glue each syllable individually on a hard board or postal sheet. Children will be asked to synthesize each syllable to form the word.   Cognitive/language Children will be asked to drill or look for the words in the notebook or clipped sheet and pronounce it. Children will be asked to pronounce each letter individually according to the alphabet. Children will be asked to recognize each syllable and pronounce it. Children will be asked to combine each syllable to form a word. Children will be asked to spell each word without looking at it. Children will practice reading story books as they become familiar with these words obtained from the story books.   Social Children will be grouped to work in team. Children will divide syllables among themselves. Children in group will glue each syllable on a postal sheet or hard board. Children in group will work together to combine the syllables into a word. Children will be asked to pronounce the word together.   Emotional Children will be asked to share their experience obtained during the group exercise or project with their peers. Children will be asked to state how they feel about the group exercise today with peers. Children will be asked to express their likes or dislikes with teacher regarding how they feel about such exercise. Children will be encouraged to practice these syllables at home or in class. Children will be given affirmation for the job well done during the exercise period.  
Materials (i.e., list every single item needed to carry out the activity with children. For example: paint, paper, leaves, and smocks):   Materials needed for this activity include the following: Postal sheets (11 X 17 inches), crayons, color pencils, Car board, Sheets (11 X 19 inches), paper glues or glue sticks (10 pieces), Magazines containing upper and lower case letters or printed spelling lists (10 pieces), Scissors (10 pieces), Boxes (5 pieces), 2 B pencils (10) and Green Light Reader: For the reader who’s ready to Go written by Susan Stevens Crummel and illustrated by Janet Sevens.    
Procedures (i.e., list all steps that are necessary to carry out this activity – anyone reading this section should be able to copy and carry out plan):   Students identify and gather all materials required to carry out the activity on syllabification. Students cut letters including lower and upper case letters from magazines or printed spelling lists using scissors. They identify and choose a spelling or spellings from the spelling lists given to them by the teacher. The spelling chosen is pronounced and divided into syllables. The letters cut from the magazine or the printed spelling lists are glued on the postal sheet according to syllabification of the word chosen from the list. The syllables are pronounced individually and they are then joined to form the whole word. The word given to each group or student is pronounced by the group or student during group or individual presentation.    
Variations (i.e., how can the activity be changed to create new interest for the children?  For example: perhaps the activity will be done outside rather than inside. Perhaps a scent will be added to the play dough mixture. How can you tweak it a little?):   This activity will be characterized by grouping children into teams or individualized activity taking into consideration all the domains of children as specified under the objective. After the completion of the syllabification exercises, the children will move to the playground to exercise their gross motor capability daily.    
Divergent Questions: (i.e., a divergent question is open-ended and does not have a right or wrong answer. For example: What would happen if? What does this remind you of?):   The below listed questions can be used in the syllabification activities to enable students think and to express themselves.   Tell me what you understand about syllables according to our lesson. How do syllables help you pronounce words that you have never seen before? Share with the class what you learn during our group works on syllables. What benefit you will receive after having learned about syllables?    
Modifications: (i.e., describe appropriate modifications to the activity for children who may need them. Be sure to identify the specific reason for the modification. Modifications should be related to the activity):               Children with cognitive impairment should learn one syllable in a word daily. Children with vision impairment should learn the spelling of the word, but they cannot be involved in cutting of letters from the magazine and then gluing them to the postal sheet. Children with paralysis or motor disability (hands affected) should be excluded from cutting and gluing of letters to postal sheet; instead, they can be placed in the group that is obligated to learn the spelling orally. Children with social/emotional disability that find it very hard to work with peers should be separated and placed in the individual learning environment.    
Preschool Planning Form: The Five Topics covered in the activity plans   Changes to the Environment (each of the following Learning Centers should have 5 items you will add/remove/modify to correlate with topic):
BLOCKS: 1. ABC blocks 2.unit blocks 3 open shelves labeled 4.container- clear, plastic 5.small toys people  
DRAMATIC PLAY: 1. Cooking utensil such as pots/pans 2.Jackets, shirts, dress 3.gas station 4.stuff animals 5.costumes
MANIPULATIVES: 1. Small and large beads 2.shape sorters 3 pegs and peg boards 4.nunt, bolts, an screw 5. Train tracks and trains
SENSORY: 1. Magazines 2.leaves 3.liquid tempera 4.paper scraps 5. Boxes, cardboard tubes
ART: 1. Large and small crayons 2.finger paints 3.glue/paste 4.pencils, pens, or erasers 5. Cotton balls or pompoms
LIBRARY/LITERACY: 1. Pretend story about people 2.books showing industry 3.books showing animals 4.book about red 5. Human body
SCIENCE:  1. Flowers 2.pets acceptable to health authority 3.factual books 4.magnifying glass 5. Maps and globes
MATH: 1. Liquid with dry measuring cup 2.magnatic shapes 3.play monies 4.number books 5. Playing cards
PHYSICAL (indoor, outdoor): 1. Climbing equipment, 2.Sodeo 3balls. 4.jump ropes and small wooden 5. Tumbling mats blocks
SOCIAL STUDIES: 1. ATLAS 2.globes 3.Historical and contemporary stories about people 4.Books in various languages 5. Factual books on life experience
TRANSITIONS: 1. Arrivals 2.Hand washing 3.cleaning and sensitizing tables 4.Snacks,lunches, and dinners 5. Departures
OTHER: 1.5 extra books about people 2.5 extra books about animals 3.5 extra books about nature 4.5 extra books about inclusion/exceptionalities 5.5 extra about diversities
ONGOING PROJECTS: 1. Postal sheets (11 X 17 inches) 2. color pencils, Car board 3. Sheets (11 X 19 inches), paper glues or glue sticks (10 pieces), Magazines containing upper and lower case letters or printed spelling lists (10 pieces) 4. Scissors (10 pieces), Boxes (5 pieces), 2 B pencils (10) 5. Green Light Reader: For the reader who’s ready to Go written by Susan Stevens Crummel and illustrated by Janet Sevens.  
   

Phase 3: Reflection & Documentation

This phase requires you to REFLECT on the 5 activities you implemented and to identify and explain how the learning was documented for children, families, staff, and/or outsiders. Be clear and specific.

Activity Goal Domain What worked well? How could you improve this activity? What did you learn? Children’s responses Evidence of learning provided to children Evidence of learning provided to others (families)
Developmental Checklist To assess the domains of children Physical Cognitive Language Social Children were easily accessible. Spending more time could improve the activity. I learned about the individual child developmental milestone differences. Children’s responses were varied. Children participated and responded to questions and the various activities carried out in the project. Parents responded to questions and some asked that information about their children assessment should be given them after the completion of the project and children also responded to the various assessments carried out on them.
Anecdotal Record To assess the domains of children Physical Cognitive Language Social Children were easily accessible. Spending more time could improve the activity. I learned about the individual child developmental milestone differences. Children’s responses were varied. Children participated and responded to questions and the various activities carried out in the project. Parents responded to questions and some asked that information about their children assessment should be given them after the completion of the project and children also responded to the various assessments carried out on them.
Running record To assess the domains of children Physical Cognitive Language Social Children were easily accessible. Spending more time could improve the activity. I learned about the individual child developmental milestone differences.   Children’s responses were varied. Children participated and responded to questions and the various activities carried out in the project. Parents responded to questions and some asked that information about their children assessment should be given them after the completion of the project and children also responded to the various assessments carried out on them.  
Child and Family Interviews To assess the domains of children Physical Cognitive Language Social Children were easily accessible. Teacher’s intervention for family to comply with students timely could improve the activity.     I learned about the individual child developmental milestone differences. Children’s responses were varied. Children participated and responded to questions and the various activities carried out in the project. Parents responded to questions and some asked that information about their children assessment should be given them after the completion of the project and children also responded to the various assessments carried out on them.
Activity plans Implementations To nurture the domains of children  Physical Cognitive Language Social The activity plans are easily implemented. Giving more time to students to implement the activity or reducing the assessment tools components could improve the activity. I learned about the individual child developmental milestone differences.  Children’s responses were varied. Children participated and responded to questions and the various activities carried out in the project. Parents responded to questions and some asked that information about their children assessment should be given them after the completion of the project and children also responded to the various assessments carried out on them.