PMI Teaching Seminar

INTRODUCTION

Scriptural Reading:  

Then the eleven disciples went to Galilee, to the mountain where Jesus had told them to go. When they saw him, they worshiped him; but some doubted. Then Jesus came to them and said, “All authority in heaven and on earth has been given to me. Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age.”(Matt. 28:16–20 NIV).

  Text: Matt. 28:16–20  
Subject: What are the Responsibilities of Disciples as Commanded in Scripture?  
Complements:
1. Jesus commands disciples to go (mission) to potential disciples of all nations (verse 19 a).
2. Jesus commands disciples to baptize (inclusion) disciples (verse 19 c).
3. Jesus commands disciples to teach (pedagogy) disciples (verse 20 a).
4. Jesus commands disciples to make (discipleship) disciples (verse 19 b).  
Exegetical Idea: The Lord instructs his disciples to go to all nations and make disciples of all nations; therefore, evangelism is the command from the Lord.
Homiletical Idea: You are called or ordained to win souls for Christ.

TEACHING NOTES

Historical Context

“While Matthew did not sign his own name to “his” gospel, the early church uniformly attested to the apostle’s authorship of the book. As early as AD 140, a Christian named Papias wrote that Matthew had compiled the sayings of the Lord in Hebrew (presumably before Matthew translated them into Greek for a larger audience).

Matthew’s name appears in all the biblical lists of the twelve apostles, though Mark and Luke refer to him as Levi. His history as a tax collector distinguished him from the other apostles, and immediately after his call to follow Jesus, an event he recorded in Matthew 9:9. Matthew hosted a feast for Jesus in his home with an invitation list made up of Matthew’s sinful friends. Apparently Matthew did not think it odd that Jesus and he would associate with the sinful and downtrodden of society.

Matthew is the most Jewish-centric of the four gospels. The apostle regularly invoked the writings of the Old Testament prophets in an effort to illustrate Jesus’ identity as Israel’s long-awaited Messiah.

However, the gospel of Matthew has been notoriously difficult to date. Several factors speak to a date ranging from AD 60–65. First of all, the book makes no mention of the destruction of the temple, an event which occurred in AD 70. Such a cataclysmic event likely would have received some comment, particularly in a book so clearly influenced by Judaism. The largely Jewish character of the book also suggests it was written at a time when much of the evangelism by Christians was directed more exclusively at Jews, something that became less and less common as the decades passed. Finally, many scholars believe Mark to have been the first gospel composed, making it most probable that Matthew was written soon after.

The apostle Matthew, a Jew himself, offered a decidedly Jewish perspective on the ministry of Jesus. He included more than fifty direct citations and even more indirect allusions from the Old Testament. This exceeds any of the other gospels and indicates that Matthew had the Jewish population in mind when he sat down to write. Matthew’s extensive connections between Jesus and the Old Testament provide ample prophetic evidence for Jesus’ ministry but also give contemporary readers a glimpse into how first-century readers approached the Old Testament with a Christ-centered mind-set.

In addition, Matthew’s gospel answers the question on the mind of every Jewish reader: “If Jesus is the King of the Jews, then where is God’s promised kingdom?” Matthew reveals that Jesus did offer the kingdom to Israel, but the offer was rejected (Matthew 4:1716:13–2821:42–43). God’s primary work in the world is now accomplished through the building of Christ’s church, after which Jesus will come again to earth and establish His kingdom ruling the world from Israel.

Matthew wrote his account of Jesus’ ministry to show that Jesus was and is indeed the King, Israel’s long-awaited Messiah. He reflected this concern in his opening line, “The record of the genealogy of Jesus the Messiah, the son of David, the son of Abraham” (Matthew 1:1). From there, Matthew consistently took his readers back to the Old Testament, providing Old Testament testimony regarding the birth of Jesus, Bethlehem as the location of Jesus’ birth, the flight to Egypt, Herod’s slaughter of the infants, and the beginning of Jesus’ ministry. In a world where many in the Jewish community had claimed the role of Messiah for themselves, Matthew’s commitment to grounding the life of Jesus in the Old Testament raised Jesus above the multitude of these false messiahs. The apostle painted a portrait of our Lord that highlights His uniqueness among all others to ever walk this earth.

After enduring four hundred years of prophetic silence, God’s people must have wondered whether or not He had deserted them. After centuries of regular communication from God, the people found themselves without a genuine prophet or spokesman for God. However, the ministries of John and Jesus reminded God’s people that He had not forgotten them. God’s silence during that period was merely a precursor to pulling the linchpin of His redemptive plan. God hadn’t forgotten. He remembered His people. Matthew made that clear.

It was true then, and it is certainly true today. Do you ever feel as though God has deserted you or that He sits in silence in the face of your requests? As we read through the pages of Matthew, not only do we see Jesus Christ revealed as Israel’s King and Messiah, but His coming to earth as God in the flesh reminds us of His deep love for us. Now resurrected and ascended, the Lord Jesus will always be with us, even to the end of time (Matthew 28:20).

Christ’s commission to His followers is still His mandate to us today: “Make disciples of all the nations” (Matthew 28:19). Christ’s work of building His church is the work He does through each of us.”[1]

TEXTUAL ANALYSIS

Key words and Phrases

Nations (verse 19 A)

Jesus commands his disciples to go to all nations. The word nations in the passage in Greek is ethnos  refers to people. It refers to a race, a nation, nations (as distinct from Israel). The Greek word “ethnos” comes from ethō, which means”forming a custom or culture”). It indicates people joined by practicing similar customs or common culture; nation (s), usually referring to unbelieving Gentiles (non-Jews). Jesus commands his disciples to go and to preach to the unbelieving world as opposed to going to the Jews world (Matt. 4:15; 6:32; 10:5, 18; 12:18, 21; 20:19, 20; 21; Mark 10:38; Luke 18:32). Jesus was specific when he sent his disciples with reference to the kind of audiences they were required to evangelize.

Jesus Commands Disciples To Go (Verse 19 A).

The word “to go” or “go” in Greek as mentioned in verse 19 (a) is poreuomai.  Poreúomai is from poros, which means “passageway”. It means to transport, moving something from one destination (port) to another; (figuratively) to go or depart, emphasizing the personal meaning which is attached to reaching the particular destination. It reads in Acts, “And they went through the region of Phrygia and Galatia, having been forbidden by the Holy Spirit to speak the word in Asia. And when they had come up to Mysia, they attempted to go into Bithynia, but the Spirit of Jesus did not allow them. So, passing by Mysia, they went down to Troas. And a vision appeared to Paul in the night: a man of Macedonia was standing there, urging him and saying, “Come over to Macedonia and help us.”And when Paulhad seen the vision, immediately, we sought to go on into Macedonia, concluding that God had called us to preach the gospel to them.”(Acts 16:6–10 NIV).

In Acts 16:7, “to go” into Bithynia, the verb “poreuomai” which means I go is also mentioned indicating a particular destination or a place. Paul and his comrades were on evangelistic mission; however, the Holy Spirit forbids them to preach to those places they desired, but sent them to Macedonia to preach the gospel. On the evangelistic endeavor, it is necessary to pray and to ask God whom and where we should go to preach. Sometimes we are caught in the situation that the people we are evangelizing refuse to pay audience to us. If such incidence happens, there is no need to waste time; therefore, it will be necessary to take off to another place and people the Holy Spirit is leading us to go to. It is not surprising that the Holy Spirit could not allow Paul and his comrades to preach to those regions they desired preaching. God did not send them to those places. God has sent them to the people of Macedonia. God has a Macedonia’s call for every soul winners. Paul was called to the Gentiles. Whom and where has God sent you today?

Jesus Commands Disciples To Make Disciples (Verse 19 B).

The Greek verb “mathéteuó,” is defined as to be a disciple or to make a disciple. Its usage include:  I make a disciple of, train in discipleship. I am trained, discipled, instructed. Mathēteúō  is helping someone to progressively learn the Word of God to become a matured, growing disciple (literally, “a learner,” a true Christ-follower), to train (develop) in the truths of Scripture and the lifestyle required. The trainer or the disciple maker actually reproduces himself or herself in the life of the disciple with reference to doctrine, practices, and norms of the institutionalized system of religion or movement.

Jesus Commands Disciples To Baptize Disciples (Verse 19 C).

The Greek verb transliterated as baptizo”is defined as to dip, sink or submerge, but specifically of ceremonial dipping; I baptize. Baptízō  means”submerge” (Souter); hence, baptize, to immerse (literally, “dip under“). Baptízō) implies submersion (“immersion”), in contrast to antéxomai (“sprinkle”). Jesus commanded his disciples to baptize instead of sprinkling. Any practice other than submersion or immersion is not baptism, but rather a practice that is humanized in nature. Such religious practice is dogmatic or traditionalized.

Jesus Commands Disciples To Teach Disciples (Verse 20)

The Greek verb teach originally comes from the verb “didaskó.” It means to teach. Didáskō (from daō, “learn”) is defined as to teach (literally, “cause to learn”); instruct, impart knowledge (disseminate information). Didáskō (“teach”) nearly always refers to teaching the Scriptures (the written Word of God). The key role of teaching Scripture is shown by its great frequency in the NT, and the variety of word-forms (cognates). The church of the Jesus Christ is commanded to teach Scriptures to disciples and make sure that they observe all what have been taught.

To Observe the Teaching (verse 20)

The Greek verb observe is “téreó. It means to watch over, to guard. Its usage include: I keep, I guard, I observe, or I watch over. Tēréō (from tēros, “a guard”) means to properly maintain (preserve); (figuratively) spiritually guard (watch), or keep intact without compromise.

TEACHING OUTLINE

Text: Matt. 28:16–20

Subject: What are the Responsibilities of Disciples as Commanded in the Great Commission?

A. Jesus commands disciples to go (verse 19 a).

B. Jesus commands disciples to make disciples (verse 19 b).

C. Jesus commands disciples to baptize disciples (verse 19 c).

D. Jesus commands disciples to teach disciples (verse 20 a).

OBSERVATIONS

  1. The disciples obeyed Jesus’ instruction (verse 16).
  2. Some disciples recognized Jesus; on the contrary, others doubted him (verse 17).
  3. Jesus introduced himself to them as someone who has authority (verse 18).
  4. Jesus gave command to them (verse 19).
  5. Jesus sent them to specific group of people (verse 19).
  6. Jesus commanded them to baptize (verse 19).
  7. Jesus commanded them to make disciples of all of them among the Gentiles race (verse 19).
  8. Jesus commanded them to teach scripture (verse 20).
  9. Jesus commanded them to baptize in the name of the Father, Son, and the Holy Spirit (verse 20).
  10. Jesus promised the disciples his presence at all time wherever they go (verse 20).

INTERPRETATION

The Lord is calling or has called the church to a soul souls winning endeavor; therefore, he has promised provisions and protections for the church in the midst of hardships, trials, and dangers. In the midst of these happenings, he has promised to be with the church till the end of the age.

APPLICATION

Evangelism is being commanded in scripture; therefore, it is the responsibility of every church to win souls for the kingdom of God. Pastoral ministry is the ministry obligated to teach this subject to membership so that everyone can be involved in the soul winning endeavor. The church of Christ is encouraged to draw schedule for evangelism on periodic basis to reach the unsaved people groups of the world through person to person or open air evangelism.

INTRODUCTION

Scriptural Reading:

In those days when the number of disciples was increasing, the Hellenistic Jews among them complained against the Hebraic Jews because their widows were being overlooked in the daily distribution of food. So the Twelve gathered all the disciples together and said, “It would not be right for us to neglect the ministry of the word of God in order to wait on tables. Brothers and sisters, choose seven men from among you who are known to be full of the Spirit and wisdom. We will turn this responsibility over to themand will give our attention to prayer and the ministry of the word.” This proposal pleased the whole group. They chose Stephen, a man full of faith and of the Holy Spirit; also Philip, Procorus, Nicanor, Timon, Parmenas, and Nicolas from Antioch, a convert to Judaism. They presented these men to the apostles, who prayed and laid their hands on them. So the word of God spread. The number of disciples in Jerusalem increased rapidly, and a large number of priests became obedient to the faith (Acts 6:1–7 NIV).

  Text: Acts 6:1–7  
Subject: What are the Steps of Ordination?
Complements:
1. Men are chosen (verse 5).
2. Men are presented to the apostles (verse 6).
3. Men are prayed for (verse 6 b).
Exegetical Idea: God uses man to discern , to choose, to present laborers for his Kingdom, and to ordain man for the works of the ministry.    
Homiletical Idea: The Lord ordains and uses man to confirm the ordination.

TEACHING NOTES

Historical Context

“The title of the book of Acts comes from the Greek word praxis, a word often used in early Christian literature to describe the great deeds of the apostles or other significant believers. This title accurately reflects the contents of the book, which is a series of vignettes chronicling the lives of key apostles (especially Peter and Paul) in the decades immediately following Christ’s ascension into heaven.

Luke’s identification as the author of this work was unquestioned throughout ancient times. It shows a clear progression from the gospel according to Luke, picking up just where that book left off. An ancient prologue to Luke’s gospel indicates that Luke was first a follower of the apostles and then became close with Paul. This is exactly how the book of Acts unfolds, beginning with Peter and ending with Paul. Luke even began to speak in the first person plural in the latter portion of Acts, as he traveled the Roman Empire alongside Paul (Acts 16:10).

Acts is the only biblical book that chronicles the history of the church immediately after Jesus’ ascension. As such, it provides us with a valuable account of how the church was able to grow and spread out from Jerusalem into the rest of the Roman Empire. In only three decades, a small group of frightened believers in Jerusalem transformed into an empire-wide movement of people who had committed their lives to Jesus Christ, ending on a high note with Paul on the verge of taking the gospel to the highest government official in the land—the Emperor of Rome.

Acts can be neatly divided into two sections, the first dealing primarily with the ministry of Peter in Jerusalem and Samaria (Acts 1–12) and the second following Paul on his missionary journeys throughout the Roman Empire (Acts 13–28). Acts is significant for chronicling the spread of the gospel, not only geographically but also culturally. It records the transition from taking the gospel to an exclusively Jewish audience—with Peter preaching to a small group in the Upper Room—to the gospel going out among the Gentiles, primarily under the ministry of the apostle Paul. The transition is best illustrated by Peter’s vision in which he heard a voice telling him, “What God has cleansed, no longer consider unholy” (10:15). This led Peter to then share the gospel with many Gentiles. God wants His message of hope and salvation to extend to all people—“in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and even to the remotest part of the earth” (1:8).

What opportunities for sharing the gospel can you take advantage of in the days to come? This question should ring through your mind as you page through the book of Acts. In virtually every chapter, apostles such as Peter and Paul powerfully present the gospel to individuals and groups of people. The apostles portrayed in Acts shine with evangelistic zeal, showing a striking transition from the often misguided disciples of the Gospels. Clearly the apostles’ faith in the death and resurrection of Jesus produced a noticeable change in their hearts through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Too often, our own lives do not reflect that sort of change. We struggle with fears over how others will react to our faith or with breaking out of our own routine long enough to invest in the life of someone else who needs the gospel. Allow Acts to encourage you to walk more closely with God so that you might make Christ’s name known with the boldness and the zeal of the apostles.”[2]

TEXTUAL ANALYSIS

Key Words and Phrases

To Wait On Tables (verse 2)

The ministry God has given ministers can sometimes be overwhelming ones; therefore, it is advisable that ministers of the gospel take heeds against such happening in the ministry. From the passage, it is learned that the early disciples or the apostles were faced with such problem. They were sensitive to time to leave the preoccupied jobs and have them distributed among the ready and the qualified. The Holy Spirit told them to stop waiting on tables in order to attend to the ministry of the Word; in this light, seven men were chosen as instructed by the Holy Spirit. The phrase “to wait on tables is diakoneó. It is a verb which indicates to serve, to minister, particularly of a slave who waits on guests in order to serve them. It means caring for the needs of others as the Lord guides in an active way or manner (1 Tim 3:9–10; Heb. 6:10–12).

Select/Choose (verse 3)

The Holy Spirit spoke to the apostles to choose or to select seven men full of wisdom and of the Holy Spirit to wait on tables (diakoneó). The verb in Greek meaning to choose or I choose is episkeptomai. It means I look upon, I visit, I look out, or I select. It means to look upon in order to help or to benefit, equivalent to to look after, have acare for,provide for (Luke 7:16).

Being Well Attested

Those chosen as instructed by the Holy Spirit were being attested by the apostles through the leading of the Holy Spirit. The Greek verb used in the passage is martureó. It means I bear witness, or I testify by evidence. This testimony is an indicator of good reputation or approval gained that can be realistically proven.

Men are chosen (verse 5)

After being attested through the leading of the Holy Spirit, they were being selected or chosen to carry out the daily activities while the apostles paid attention to the ministry of the word. The Greek verb to select or to choose is eklegó or eklégomai. It means I pick out for myself, I choose, or I select. It is highly deliberate choice (i.e. real heart-preference) with a definite outcome (as with the destination of divine selection for salvation).

Men are Presented to the Apostles (verse 6 a)

After men were chosen, they were presented to the Lord for confirmation. They made them stand before the Lord in the presence of many witnesses. The verb to present or to make to stand is histémi. Additionally, it means continue safe and sound, stand unharmed (Acts 26:22), to stand ready or prepared (Ephesians 6:14), or to be of a steadfast mind (1 Corinthians 10:12).

Men are Prayed for (Verse 6 b)

After their presentation, the apostles laid hands and prayed for them; as the result, the word of God spread. Empowerment or the grace of God is imparted when believers pray together during ordination or contemporary or related ceremony. Prayer is the mean of calling God’s attention to a specific situation with relative to endorsement or approval. The Greek verb I pray or I offer prayer is proseuchomai. It literally means to interact with the Lord by switching human wishes (ideas) for His wishes as He imparts faith (“divine persuasion“). Accordingly, praying/proseuxomai is closely inter-connected with pístis (“faith”) in the NT. See: Acts 6:5, 6, 14:22, 23; Eph 6:16-18; Col 1:3,4; 2 Thes 3:1,2; Js 5:13-15; Jude 20.

TEACHING OUTLINE

Text: Acts 6:1–7

Subject: What are the Steps of Ordination?

A. Men are chosen (verse 5).

B. Men are presented to the apostles (verse 6a).

C. Men are prayed for (verse 6b).

OBSERVATION

  1. Discrimination is birthed (verse 1).
  2. Sensitivity intervened (verse 2).
  3. Action is taken (verses 3 & 4).
  4. Proposal is accommodated (verse 5).
  5. Proposal is endorsed (verse 6).
  6. Common goal agreement in the Spirit leads to harvest of souls from the satanic kingdom (verse 7).
  7. God knows the problem every minister faces in ministry (verse 2).
  8. God knows the answer to the problem the church faces (verse 3 & 4).
  9. God is the one who gives the increase (verse 7).
  10. God is the revealer, intervener, and sustainer of the ministry He has called us to (verse 7).

INTERPRETATION

God is the revealer of the problems the church faces and He is the solution to the problem provided the church cooperates with God.

APPLICATION

To be successful in solving the church’s problems, God requires the church to listen and to act according to his mandate. In the ministry that God has called you to, what are you doing that makes you to prevail or to regress? Upon the completion of this lesson, ministers are advised to be sensitive to the needs of the people they are leading as well as being sensitive the placement God has called you to. This post objective application is useful to the minister of God in the long-term ministry’s operation for effective functioning in the area of leadership and job placement in the kingdom of God.

INTRODUCTION

Scriptural Reading:

You then, my son, be strong in the grace that is in Christ Jesus. And the things you have heard me say in the presence of many witnesses entrust to reliable people who will also be qualified to teach others.

Text: 2 Timothy 2:1–2
Subject: The Patterns of Exemplary Leadership
Complements:
1. Exemplary leaders listen to their Master (verse 2a). – 1st Generation Leader
2. Exemplary leaders entrust responsibility to reliable leaders (verse 2b).
– 2nd Generation Leader
3. Exemplary leaders entrust responsibility to qualified leaders (verse 2c).
– 3rd Generation Leader.
4. Exemplary leaders entrust responsibility to teaching leaders (verse 2c). – 4th Generation Leader
Observable Patterns of Exemplary Leadership:
Listening–Master 1st . —————-Paul Leader
Entrusting–Reliable 2nd Gen.______Timothy Leader Entrusting–Qualified 3rd Gen.______Exemplary Leader Entrusting–Teaching 4th Gen._____Exemplary Leader
Exegetical Idea: Exemplary leadership is emulative and it is patterned after the lifestyle of the Master and runs down to the successive generations of leadership.
Homiletical Idea: What is your reaction to your leaders and his instruction or teaching?

TEACHING NOTES

Historical Context

“By the time Paul wrote his second letter to Timothy, the young pastor had been ministering to the church at Ephesus for four years, and it had been almost that long since he had received his first letter from Paul. Timothy had been a faithful servant to Paul since he had left home with the apostle more than a decade earlier. Since then, Timothy had ministered alongside Paul for the duration of both the second and third missionary journeys, in places such as Troas, Philippi, and Corinth. Timothy was not unfamiliar to the Ephesians when he settled in Ephesus to minister, having served there alongside Paul for a period of close to three years on Paul’s third missionary journey. Paul wrote again to this young leader in the church at Ephesus to provide him encouragement and fortitude in the face of difficulties and trials.

Paul wrote 2 Timothy from a dark and damp Roman prison cell, just before his death in AD 67. The Roman emperor Nero had been slowly descending into madness since his ascent to the throne in AD 54, a process exacerbated by the great fire of Rome in AD 64 that burned half the city. With the residents of Rome in an uproar, Christians became a convenient target for Nero, who used believers as scapegoats for his city’s own lack of preparedness. Paul was one of those caught up in this persecution and was beheaded by Roman officials soon after writing this letter.

The second letter to Timothy offers a picture of Paul at the end of his ministry, just before his death. Certain personal details in the letter reveal a man settling his accounts and preparing for the inevitable. At the close of the letter, Paul mentioned a significant number of people—some who had wronged him and others who had served faithfully alongside him (2 Timothy 4:9–21). It is as if Paul were giving Timothy a “state of the church” address, updating Timothy on the current state of their acquaintances and friends so that the young pastor could carry on after Paul’s departure.

Paul understood that the ministry would only become more difficult for Timothy with the apostle’s impending death. (Indeed, at some point after this letter from Paul, Timothy was imprisoned for his faith (Hebrews 13:23). Paul knew that Timothy’s task of keeping the church within the bounds of sound doctrine while encouraging believers to live their lives well for the sake of Christ would be an often thankless and difficult task. Though hardship would come, Paul wanted Timothy to continue in those things he had learned, drawing on the rich heritage of faith that had been passed down to the young pastor, not just from Paul but also from his mother and grandmother (2 Timothy 1:5–63:14–15).

The most striking feature of Paul’s encouragement comes when the aging apostle used a phrase that showed up prominently in his letter to Timothy four years prior. In that earlier letter, Paul exhorted Timothy to “fight the good fight” (1Timothy 1:186:12). But in this letter, Paul turned that phrase on himself, writing that he had “fought the good fight . . . finished the course . . . [and] kept the faith” (2 Timothy 4:7). What a great encouragement it must have been to the young pastor of the church at Ephesus to know that his mentor boldly modeled his perseverance in the faith, even to the point of death.

Second Timothy brings us to the brink of death, forcing us to consider its reality and how we might react when faced with it. Paul’s response instructs us still today. His mind was not on himself, dwelling on the injustice that had befallen him. Instead, trusting that God had him right where He wanted him, the aging apostle turned his attention to others, specifically to the church and to his young protégé, Timothy.”[3]

Where do you hope your thoughts linger as you come to the end of your days?

TEXTUAL ANALYSIS

Key Words and Phrases

The Things You Hear Me Say (verse 1)

The above mentioned sentence should serve as a guide to church leadership when it comes to listening to your spiritual leader. God has placed the individual in the position to guide, to nurture, to exemplify, and to lead. Paul being a spiritual father and leader to Timothy, instructs him to teach reliable leader who also will teach qualified leader to do the same. Paul asserts, “the thing you hear me say” teach others who also will do the same. The Greek verb used in the passage is akouó. It is defined as to hear or to listen. It is defined as hearing God’s voice which prompts Him to birth faith within (Romans 10:17).

Entrust to Reliable Leader (verse 2)

Paul instructed Timothy to entrust to reliable leader who also will teach others to do the same. He used the Greek verb paratithémi which means to place beside or to set before. Additionally, it means entrust; commit to in a very up-close-and-personal way (note the force of the prefix para). It means to place beside or alongside. Someone who is being placed in leadership should be trustworthy or reliable. It is a virtue of a leader that enables him or her to be followed. Credibility, reliability, and integrity should be exhibited by a leader.

Faithful/Reliable Man

The term faithfulness is the result of credibility, reliability, or integrity; however, faithfulness in this case is connected to a spiritual trait that a church leader must exhibit to exemplify good stewardship in the kingdom of God. Being faithful is the same as be reliable. The Greek adjectival modifier used in the passage is pisto which indicates trustworthiness, faithfulness, or reliability. It comes from peíthō, means “persuaded”) – properly, faithful (loyalty to faith; literally, fullness of faith); typically, of believing the faith God imparts. Such reliability is accomplished by the leader through the fear of God. Another Greek word closed to pisto is hikanos. It is defined as being sufficient or fit to hold a spiritual position in the house of God. Someone who is chosen to serve in spiritual leadership position should fit spiritual to occupy such position. The qualifications of leaders recorded in 1 Timothy 3:1–12 should be accorded to when chosen leaders in the assembly.

Teach Qualified Leader

One of the characteristics of leadership is a leader should be able to teach others. In this light, Paul instructs Pastor Timothy at Ephesus to teach reliable leader who also will be able to teach qualified leader the same. The Greek verb used is didaskó which indicates I teach, I direct, or I admonish. It refers to teaching the Scriptures (the written Word of God). The key role of teaching Scripture is shown by its great frequency in the NT.

TEACHING OUTLINE

Text: 2 Timothy 2:1–2

Subject: What are the Patterns of Exemplary Leadership?

A. Exemplary Leader listens (verse 2a).

B. Exemplary leader entrust responsibility to reliable leaders (verse 2b).

C. Exemplary leader entrusts responsibility to qualified leaders (verse 2c).

D. Exemplary leader entrusts responsibility to teaching leaders (verse 2d).

OBSERVATIONS

  1. Leader does well in leading through the grace of God (verse 1).
  2. Good leader admonishes his followers (verse 1).
  3. Good leader tells his follower to do the good things he does (verse 2).
  4. Leader should be example of what he teaches and does (verse 2).
  5. Good leader dedicates authority to his followers (verse 2).
  6. Leadership should be successive with reference to behavior (verse 2).
  7. Good leadership should be reproductive (verse 2).
  8. Good leadership should be modeled (verse 2).
  9. God is interested in replication of good leadership in the church (verse 2).
  10. There is a need for a leader to be good example of what he teaches, does, and believes (verse 2).

INTERPRETATION

God is interested in the successive generation of leadership in the house of God; therefore, he is asking leaders to be life models of their leadership execution in beliefs, deeds, and truths.

APPLICATION

Leadership is wholly practical instead of theoretical. What a leader does in the community of domicile is vital to those who see him or her. Life model leadership should be the expectation of every true Godly leadership. Leaders are to reproduce themselves in those who are following them and should be good example. Pastoral leadership has the responsibility to live biblically what it teaches, to teach biblically for others to follow, and to inspire others to be reliable, to be qualified, and to be teachable.

INTRODUCTION

Scriptural Reading:

So Christ himself gave the apostles, the prophets, the evangelists, the pastors and teachers,to equip his people for works of service, so that the body of Christ may be built upuntil we all reach unity in the faith and in the knowledge of the Son of God and become mature, attaining to the whole measure of the fullness of Christ.

Then we will no longer be infants, tossed back and forth by the waves, and blown here and there by every wind of teaching and by the cunning and craftiness of people in their deceitful scheming. Instead, speaking the truth in love, we will grow to become in every respect the mature body of him who is the head, that is, Christ. From him the whole body, joined and held together by every supporting ligament, grows and builds itself up in love, as each part does its work (Eph 4:11–16 NIV).

Text: Eph 4:11–16
Subject: Why Did Jesus Give Gifts to the Church?
Complement:
1. He gave gifts to the church in order to equip God’s people for the work of service (verse 12).
2. He gave gifts to the church in order to prepare God’s people to reach in the unity of the faith and knowledge of the Son of God (verse 13 a).
3. He gave gifts to the church in order to mature God’s people to attain the whole measure of the fullness of Christ (verse 13 b).
4. He gave gifts to the church in order to grow God’s people to become the mature body of Christ (verse 15 a).
Exegetical Idea: God has given gifts to the body of Christ for the equipping of the saints and works of service.
Homiletical Idea: What is your placement in the kingdom of God?
 

TEACHING NOTES

Historical Context

“For a brief time at the end of his second missionary journey, and then for more than two years on his third missionary journey, Paul ministered to the church at Ephesus (Acts 18:18–2119:1–41). During his time in this city that housed the famous temple to the Greek goddess Artemis, Paul saw many converted to faith in Jesus Christ and many others who opposed his preaching in the synagogues and homes. One prominent silversmith, Demetrius, who made implements for the worship of Artemis, found his business suffering greatly because people were converting to Christianity. The ensuing near-riot led Paul to leave the city, but only after the apostle had done much to stabilize and grow the Christian community there.

Paul wrote the letter to the Ephesians sometime in AD 60–61, around the same time he wrote Colossians and Philemon, as he sent all three letters by the hand of Tychicus, accompanied by Onesimus (Ephesians 6:21Colossians 4:7–9Philemon 1:10–12). It was during this time that Paul sat in Rome undergoing his first Roman imprisonment (Ephesians 3:14:1), making Ephesians one of the four epistles commonly known as the Prison Epistles. The others are Philippians, Colossians, and Philemon.

Second Corinthians and Galatians abound with personal touches from Paul, either about his own life or that of the recipients. Ephesians, on the other hand, stands at the opposite end of the spectrum as one of Paul’s most formal letters. While Galatians offers instructions particularly important for those churches overrun with legalism, Ephesians deals with topics at the very core of what it means to be a Christian—both in faith and in practice—regardless of any particular problem in the community.

Paul divided his letter to the Ephesians into two clear segments; applying the truths of the first makes possible the actions and lifestyle of the second. Paul spent the first three chapters of the letter discussing God’s creation of a holy community by His gift of grace in the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ. The members of this community have been chosen by God through the work of Christ, adopted as sons and daughters of God, and brought near to the Father through faith in His Son. All people with this faith—Jews and Gentiles alike—were dead in their transgressions and sins but have been made alive because of the person and work of Jesus Christ.

While Paul was not responding to a particular theological or moral problem, he wanted to protect against future problems by encouraging the Ephesians to mature in their faith. So after laying out profound theological truths in the first half of the book, Paul made his purpose clear: he expected that this community of faith would walk in accordance with its heavenly calling (Ephesians 4:1). As a result of the theological realities Christians accept by their faith in God, several practices should follow in their relationships within the church, in the home, and in the world.

The book of Ephesians hits on a wide range of moral and ethical behaviors, designed to ensure believers are living up to our heavenly calling. As we continue in our faith from day to day, month to month, and year to year, the temptation to get comfortable will always exist. However, Paul presented the gift of God in Christ and the benefits we receive so clearly that we cannot help but ask ourselves if our lives reflect that reality as they should.

How have you grown in your Christian life since you came to faith in Jesus Christ? The latter half of Ephesians makes clear that spiritual growth occurs primarily in community with others, iron sharpening iron (Proverbs 27:17). Your Christian “walk” (in other words, your daily life) is to be characterized by unity, holiness, love, wisdom, and perseverance in spiritual warfare.

Maturity yields benefits in believers’ moral lives, but it extends far beyond that as well. Increased maturity benefits the community at large, leading us as Christians to present a more consistent witness to the working of God in our lives as well as protecting us from the harmful divisions and quarrels that have plagued so many communities throughout history.”[4]

TEXTUAL ANALYSIS

Key words and Phrases

Apostles (verse 11)

In Christian circle, there is a disagreement between the conservatives and the liberals with reference to whether there exist apostles in our generation. Cessationism is the theology that asserts that the gifts recorded in Ephesians 4:11 ceased to exist when the apostles died. It believes that these ministry gifts called domata no longer exist in our generation specifically the gift of apostleship. The definition of an apostle is the individual who is being sent on a specific mission. The Greek word apostolos is a messenger, envoy, delegate, one commissioned by another to represent him in some way, especially a man sent out by Jesus Christ Himself to preach the Gospel; an apostle (1 Kings 14:6; John 13:16; 2 Cor. 8:23; Phil 2:25; Heb 3:1; Matt 10:1–4; Luke 6:13; Acts 1:26; Rev 21:14). Indeed there exist apostles in our generation. There are four classes of apostles. The first class of apostle is Jesus who was sent to die for sin in order to redeem the world (John 3:16–17). The second class of apostles is Jesus’ disciples called the apostles of the Lamb (Matt. 10). The third class of apostle is Apostle Paul whom God used to lay down New Testament foundation (Gal 1:15–16, Acts 9:3–19; 22:6–16). The fourth class of apostles is the missionary sent by God in our generation to specific peoples’ group to plant churches. An apostle is a foundation layer and his ministry is followed by signs and wonders.

Prophets (verse 11)

The next gift Jesus gave to the church when he ascended is the gift of the prophecy. A prophet in Greek is prophétés. A prophet is an interpreter or forth-teller of the divine will or a poet; a person gifted at expositing divine truth (Exodus 7:1). God reveals his mind to the prophet concerning a particular situation and the prophet unveils or reveals the problem through a spoken word in order to rebuke, to correct, to warn, to give direction with reference to a particular situation, and to exhort or to edify the body of Christ (Eph 4:11–13).

Evangelists (verse 11)

The Greek word for evangelist is euaggelistés. He is a bringer of good news or someone who has a vocational calling from God to announce the good news of the Gospel (Eph 4:11; Acts 2:18; 2 Timothy 2:5). He is a missionary or bearer of good tidings.

Pastors/Shepherds (verse 11)

The Greek word for Pastor is poimén. Poimén is a shepherded, the feeder, the protector, and ruler of a flock of men. Someone whom the lord raises to care for the total well-being of His flock (people of the Lord) (Matthew 9:36Matthew 25:32Matthew 26:31Mark 6:34Mark 14:27Luke 2:8, 15, 18, 20John 10:2, 12). Poimén is the presiding officer, manager, director of any assembly: so of Christ the Head of the church, John 10:161 Peter 2:25Hebrews 13:20 (of the Jewish Messiah, Ezekiel 34:23); of the overseers of the Christian assemblies (A. V. pastors), Ephesians 4:11.

Teachers

The Greek word for teacher is didaskalos. Didaskalos is an instructor, a teacher, or master. It derived from didáskō, “to teach.” It is an instructor acknowledged for his mastery in his field of learning; in Scripture, a Bible teacher, or competent in theology. A teacher called of God is giving divine revelation to unveil the truth of scriptures to the contemporary audience God has set before him to nurture.

Perfecting of the Saints (verse 12)

The Greek word perfecting is katartismos which indicates a preparing, an equipping, a bringing to a condition of fitness or perfecting. Katartismos has to do with exact adjustment which describes how the individual parts work together in correct order (Eph 4:12).

Ministry (verse 12)

The Greek noun for ministry is diakonia. Diakonia is service, ministry, waiting on table, ministration. It specifically refers to Spirit-empowered service guided by faith (pistis) (Acts 6:1-7, 21:19, 20; Ro 12:3, 7; 1 Cor 16:13,15; Eph 4:12,13; 1 Tim 1:12,14; 2 Tim 4:5,7.).

Building Up of the Saints (verse 12)

One of the primary objectives of the above mentioned five-fold ministry gifts is the building up of the saints for the works of service so that these saints or believers can be adequately prepared to minister in the house of God in respective of their gifting or abilities. The noun participle “building” in the Greek is oikodomé. It is a feminine noun which means the act of building, a building that is used to meet spiritual advancement or edification that prepares believers to be suitable for God’s swelling place (the church).

We Attain Unity of the faith

In the process of the believers being built up, they attain unity of the faith so that they can no longer be children maturely, but they will be prepared to handle doctrinal issues when it comes to understanding scriptures and applying them in their daily Christian walks with Christ. The Greek verb to attain or attain or reach is katantaó. It means I come down either from high land to lower sea or I arrive at or reach my destination. It is the process of development or growth process in the life of the believer in term of decision making with reference to obedience to the word of God which leads to Christian maturity. Believers attain, reach or arrive to the unity of the faith and are no longer children dissuaded by wind or false doctrines. When believers have been taught the word of God, they process the word through obedience and they and the word become cemented to the extent that their daily living is guided by God’s word. David said, “Thy word have I hid in mine heart, that I might not sin against thee (Ps 119:11 KJV). The Greek word unity is henotes. It means oneness, unity, unanimity especially the God-produced unity between believers. It is harmony from sharing likeness of nature with the Lord (Eph 4:3, 13).

Knowledge of the Son of God (verse 13)

Every believer in the house of God should have personal knowledge of how he or she met Jesus and how he or she relates to God in Christian living. Unless God reveals the Son to the sinner, the sinner never recognizes or realizes that he or she needs the Savior. At the onset of our Christian journey, we need revelation. After the onset, we also need revelation to have full knowledge of the Lord through biblical teaching and the demonstration of God’s power among us. Paul said, “I keep asking that the God of our Lord Jesus Christ, the glorious Father, may give you the Spirit of wisdom and revelation, so that you may know him better (Eph 1:17 NIV). The Greek word for knowledge mentioned in the passage is epignósis. It is defined as the knowledge of a particular point, perception, discernment, recognition, or intuition directed towards a particular object. It is the knowledge gained through first-hand relationship that is appropriate. It is the experiential knowing defined in the individual context. Every true believer must have a personal knowledge or relationship with God. Believers having personal knowing of God can eventually lead to Christian maturity as the result of Godly fear. While believers walk with the Lord, they grow and become complete or mature leading to perfection. Scripture said that as believers grow, they also become complete or mature leading to the completeness of Christian character. The Greek word used in the passage is teleios indicating having reached its end, complete, perfect, especially of the completeness of Christian character. It is the transition involving necessary stages reaching to the end-goal (spiritual journey).

TEACHING OUTLINE

Text: Eph 4:11–16

Subject: Why Did Jesus Give Gifts to the Church?

A. He gave gifts to the church in order to equip God’s people for the work of service (verse 12).

B. He gave gifts to the church in order to prepare God’s people to reach in the unity of the faith and knowledge of the Son of God (verse 13 a).

C. He gave gifts to the church in order to mature God’s people to attain the whole measure of the fullness of Christ (verse 13 b).

D. He gave gifts to the church in order to grow God’s people to become the mature body of Christ (verse 15 a).

OBSERVATIONS

  1. God had a family in mind before the creation of the universe (verse 11).
  2. God gave gifts to the church for spiritual empowerment (verse 13).
  3. God cares for every believer in the church (verse 13).
  4. God has equipped believers to do the work of ministry (verse 12).
  5. God believes in distribution of labor (verse 11).
  6. God knows that believers would be deceived (verse 14).
  7. God cares about believers’ growths (verse 15).
  8. God knows that every believer in the church can be used (verse 16).
  9. The church is rich in spiritual resources (verse 11).
  10. The church is pre-prepared and pre-equipped to make impart to this unbelieving world provided the church knows her God’s giving authority (verse 12).

INTERPRETATION

God has enriched the church spiritually to do the works of ministry without measure and these ministry gifts mentioned in this passage do operate today because God has not changed.

APPLICATION

The hosting of biblical seminars to teach on these ministry gifts help church members to know and to understand the various spiritual authorities that God has placed over the church to oversee, to build up, to win souls, to lead or to shepherd, and to instruct the body of Christ on Christian living. Knowing these ministry gifts as believers enables the Christianity community (us) to seek spiritual assistance whenever she has these spiritual needs. For example, the Christian community or the local church assembly will identity individuals in the body of Christ with these gifting abilities and so invite them to minister to the body of Christ to minister in their areas of calling. In this way, there will mutual and shared recognition and shared responsibilities among the body of Christ. Recognizing individual gifts and abilities is paramount to a productive and sustainable functional and productive ministry in the 21st Century Church.

INTRODUCTION

Scriptural Reading:

On that day a great persecution broke out against the church in Jerusalem, and all except the apostles were scattered throughout Judea and Samaria. Godly men buried Stephen and mourned deeply for him. But Saul began to destroy the church. Going from house to house, he dragged off both men and women and put them in prison (Acts 8:1–4 NIV).

  Text: Acts 8:1–4  
Subject: What Impact Did the Church’s Persecution Make to the Gospel?
Complement:
1.The apostles are scattered (verse 1).
2. The scattered apostles preached the gospel (verse4).
3. Sinners come to salving knowledge of Christ through the preaching
Exegetical Idea: The Lord allowed the persecution of the church to spread the gospel message.
Homiletical Idea: Our comfort zone in life can become sometimes a place of difficulty.

TEACHING NOTES

Historical Context

“The title of the book of Acts comes from the Greek word praxis, a word often used in early Christian literature to describe the great deeds of the apostles or other significant believers. This title accurately reflects the contents of the book, which is a series of vignettes chronicling the lives of key apostles (especially Peter and Paul) in the decades immediately following Christ’s ascension into heaven.

Luke’s identification as the author of this work was unquestioned throughout ancient times. It shows a clear progression from the gospel according to Luke, picking up just where that book left off. An ancient prologue to Luke’s gospel indicates that Luke was first a follower of the apostles and then became close with Paul. This is exactly how the book of Acts unfolds, beginning with Peter and ending with Paul. Luke even began to speak in the first person plural in the latter portion of Acts, as he traveled the Roman Empire alongside Paul (Acts 16:10).

Acts is the only biblical book that chronicles the history of the church immediately after Jesus’ ascension. As such, it provides us with a valuable account of how the church was able to grow and spread out from Jerusalem into the rest of the Roman Empire. In only three decades, a small group of frightened believers in Jerusalem transformed into an empire-wide movement of people who had committed their lives to Jesus Christ, ending on a high note with Paul on the verge of taking the gospel to the highest government official in the land—the Emperor of Rome.

Acts can be neatly divided into two sections, the first dealing primarily with the ministry of Peter in Jerusalem and Samaria (Acts 1–12) and the second following Paul on his missionary journeys throughout the Roman Empire (Acts 13–28). Acts is significant for chronicling the spread of the gospel, not only geographically but also culturally. It records the transition from taking the gospel to an exclusively Jewish audience—with Peter preaching to a small group in the Upper Room—to the gospel going out among the Gentiles, primarily under the ministry of the apostle Paul. The transition is best illustrated by Peter’s vision in which he heard a voice telling him, “What God has cleansed, no longer consider unholy” (10:15). This led Peter to then share the gospel with many Gentiles. God wants His message of hope and salvation to extend to all people—“in Jerusalem, and in all Judea and Samaria, and even to the remotest part of the earth” (1:8).

What opportunities for sharing the gospel can you take advantage of in the days to come? This question should ring through your mind as you page through the book of Acts. In virtually every chapter, apostles such as Peter and Paul powerfully present the gospel to individuals and groups of people. The apostles portrayed in Acts shine with evangelistic zeal, showing a striking transition from the often misguided disciples of the Gospels. Clearly the apostles’ faith in the death and resurrection of Jesus produced a noticeable change in their hearts through the power of the Holy Spirit.

Too often, our own lives do not reflect that sort of change. We struggle with fears over how others will react to our faith or with breaking out of our own routine long enough to invest in the life of someone else who needs the gospel. Allow Acts to encourage you to walk more closely with God so that you might make Christ’s name known with the boldness and the zeal of the apostles.”[5]

TEXTUAL ANALYSIS

Key Words and Phrases

The Apostles Are Scattered (Verse 1)

The word scattered in Greek is diaspeiró. It means to sow throughout, disperse (in foreign lands). διεσπάρην; to scatter abroad, disperse; passive of those who are driven to different places,(Acts 8:1, 4Acts 11:19).

The Scattered Apostles Preached The Gospel Message (Verse 4)

The Greek word I preach is euaggelizó. It means to announce good news. It means to proclaim “the good message” (good news). In the NT. It refers to sharing the full Gospel of Christ – literally, “gospelizing” that announces the complete message of “the good news” (the Lord’s glad tidings).

TEACHING OUTLINE

Text: Acts 8:1–4

Subject: What Impact Did the Church’s Persecution Make to the Gospel?

A. The apostles are scattered (verse 1).

B. The scattered apostles preached the gospel message (verse 4)

C. Sinners come to the salvation knowledge of Christ (verse 5–6).

OBSERVATIONS

  1. Christians do fall asleep when they physically die (verse Acts 7:59).
  2. People who are used of Satan sometimes can be greatly used o God (verse 1).
  3. The diabolical act perpetrated by Satan against a believer, such situation can be used for God’s glory or divine plan (verse 5–6).
  4. In the midst of persecution or upheaval, God used the apostles to preach the gospel (verse verse 5–6).
  5. Suffering is part of the Christian lifestyle and God can use it to prepare a believer for greater works ahead of him or her.
  6. Suffering is part of his divine plan for every believer.
  7. Anyone who is marked to be used of God has to go through the period of biblical suffering.
  8. Escaping biblical suffering as a believer is escaping his biblical call to your life.
  9. No one understands God.
  10. God’s sovereignty can be seemed in every situation.

INTERPRETATION

In the midst of upheaval against God’s people, God can use such situation for His glory to perpetuate His divine plan.

APPLICATION

Sometime ministers in ministry become complacent with reference to what God has called them to do; in this light, God wanting something he desire of them, will allow a situation to surface in order to usher them into His perfect plan. In ministry, the servant of God is advised to be sensitive of what God is calling or has called him or her to do so he or she can be in His divine plan. Teaching the congregations with reference to sensitivity to God’s plan concerning their lives is vital to the Christian ministry.

INTRODUCTION

Scriptural Reading:

 But as for you, continue in what you have learned and have become convinced of, because you know those from whom you learned it, and how from infancy you have known the Holy Scriptures, which are able to make you wise for salvation through faith in Christ Jesus. All Scripture is God-breathed and is useful for teaching, rebuking, correcting and training in righteousness, so that the servant of God[a] may be thoroughly equipped for every good work (2 Timothy 3:14–17 NIV).

  Text: 2 Timothy 3:14–17
  Subject: The Works of Scriptures
Complement:
1. Scripture teaches (verse 16a).
2. Scripture rebukes (verse 16b).
3. Scripture corrects (verse 16c).
4. Scripture trains in righteousness (verse 16d).
5. Scripture equips a servant of God for every good works (verse 17).
 
 

TEACHING NOTES

Historical Context

“By the time Paul wrote his second letter to Timothy, the young pastor had been ministering to the church at Ephesus for four years, and it had been almost that long since he had received his first letter from Paul. Timothy had been a faithful servant to Paul since he had left home with the apostle more than a decade earlier. Since then, Timothy had ministered alongside Paul for the duration of both the second and third missionary journeys, in places such as Troas, Philippi, and Corinth. Timothy was not unfamiliar to the Ephesians when he settled in Ephesus to minister, having served there alongside Paul for a period of close to three years on Paul’s third missionary journey. Paul wrote again to this young leader in the church at Ephesus to provide him encouragement and fortitude in the face of difficulties and trials.

Paul wrote 2 Timothy from a dark and damp Roman prison cell, just before his death in AD 67. The Roman emperor Nero had been slowly descending into madness since his ascent to the throne in AD 54, a process exacerbated by the great fire of Rome in AD 64 that burned half the city. With the residents of Rome in an uproar, Christians became a convenient target for Nero, who used believers as scapegoats for his city’s own lack of preparedness. Paul was one of those caught up in this persecution and was beheaded by Roman officials soon after writing this letter.

The second letter to Timothy offers a picture of Paul at the end of his ministry, just before his death. Certain personal details in the letter reveal a man settling his accounts and preparing for the inevitable. At the close of the letter, Paul mentioned a significant number of people—some who had wronged him and others who had served faithfully alongside him (2 Timothy 4:9–21). It is as if Paul were giving Timothy a “state of the church” address, updating Timothy on the current state of their acquaintances and friends so that the young pastor could carry on after Paul’s departure.

Paul understood that the ministry would only become more difficult for Timothy with the apostle’s impending death. (Indeed, at some point after this letter from Paul, Timothy was imprisoned for his faith (Hebrews 13:23). Paul knew that Timothy’s task of keeping the church within the bounds of sound doctrine while encouraging believers to live their lives well for the sake of Christ would be an often thankless and difficult task. Though hardship would come, Paul wanted Timothy to continue in those things he had learned, drawing on the rich heritage of faith that had been passed down to the young pastor, not just from Paul but also from his mother and grandmother (2 Timothy 1:5–63:14–15).

The most striking feature of Paul’s encouragement comes when the aging apostle used a phrase that showed up prominently in his letter to Timothy four years prior. In that earlier letter, Paul exhorted Timothy to “fight the good fight” (1Timothy 1:186:12). But in this letter, Paul turned that phrase on himself, writing that he had “fought the good fight . . . finished the course . . . [and] kept the faith” (2 Timothy 4:7). What a great encouragement it must have been to the young pastor of the church at Ephesus to know that his mentor boldly modeled his perseverance in the faith, even to the point of death.

Second Timothy brings us to the brink of death, forcing us to consider its reality and how we might react when faced with it. Paul’s response instructs us still today. His mind was not on himself, dwelling on the injustice that had befallen him. Instead, trusting that God had him right where He wanted him, the aging apostle turned his attention to others, specifically to the church and to his young protégé, Timothy.”[6]

Where do you hope your thoughts linger as you come to the end of your days?

TEXTUAL ANALYSIS

Key Words and Phrases

Scripture Teaches (Verse 16a)

The word scripture in Greek is graphé. It means the inspired, inerrant writings of the Bible (the 66 books of Scripture, 39 in Hebrew, 27 in Greek).

The Greek word “didaskalia” is teaching or instruction. It is applied-teaching; Christian doctrine (teaching) as it especially extends to its necessary lifestyle (applications). 

God-breathed

The Greek word “theopneustos” is God-breathed. It is God-breathed, referring to the divine inspiration (inbreathing) of Scripture (used only in 2 Tim 3:16).

Scripture Rebukes (Verse 16b).

The word rebuke in Greek is elegchos. It has to do with reproof or conviction. It is inner conviction focuses on God confirming His inbirthing of faith (“the internal persuasion from Him).

Scripture Corrects (Verse 16c).

The Greek word for correction is epanorthósis. It is a feminine noun meaning: restored to its (originalproper condition; hence, correction (referring to something that is aptly “straightened out”).

Scripture Trains In Righteousness (Verse 16d).

The Greek feminine noun for training is paideia. It means instruction that trainsforms someone to reach full development (maturity).

Scripture Equips A Servant Of God For Every Good Works (Verse 17).

The Greek word equip is exartizó. It means stressing the end-impact of Scripture on the receptive believer. Indeed the Bible thoroughly fits (“furnishes”) each believer to live in full communion with God. It is used in the passive voice in 2 Tim 3:17. ἐξηρτισμένος (having been fully equipped)

OBSERVATIONS

  1. Scripture is able to make one wise unto salvation (verse 15).
  2. Persistence in the scripture with reference to commitment is encouraged by Paul as a recommendation to Timothy (verse14).
  3. Scripture is God-breathed (verse verse 16).
  4. Scripture is useful for teaching (verse 16a).
  5. Scripture is useful for rebuking (verse 16b).
  6. Scripture is useful for correcting (verse 16c).
  7. Scripture is useful for training (verse 16d).
  8. Scripture reveals righteousness (verse 16).
  9. Scripture is the power of God to transform people into Christ like individual (verse 16).
  10. Scripture is the mean by which God communicates to humanity (verse 16).

INTERPRETATION

God uses His word for the purpose of transforming humanity into His likeness and personality; indeed, His word reveals His righteousness and makes humanity to be wise unto salvation.

APPLICATION

Since the word of God makes one wise unto salvation making humanity to be in alignment with God, ministers of the gospel should use God’s word to teach their congregations with deliberate purpose of transforming the people into God’s likeness and personality.

TEACHING OUTLINE

Text: 2 Timothy 3:14–17

Subject: The Works of Scriptures

A. Scripture teaches (verse 16a).

B. Scripture rebukes (verse 16b).

C. Scripture corrects (verse 16c).

D. Scripture trains in righteousness (verse 16d).

E. Scripture equips a servant of God for every good works (verse 17).


[1]Charles R. Swindoll, “The Bible Teaching Ministry”. Insight for Living, n.p [Cited 14 May 2019] Online: http://www.insight.org/resources/bible/the-gospels/matthew.

;[2]Ibid., n.p.

[3]Ibid., n.p.

[4]Ibid., n.p.

;[5]Ibid., n.p.

[6]Ibid., n.p.